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Search results for: revolutionary war


Litchfield’s Revolutionary War Soldiers’ Tree

The first Arbor Day was held on April 10, 1872, and became an international event 11 years later when Birdsley Northrup of Kent, Connecticut, introduced the concept to Japan.

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Revolutionary War

Revolutionary War (1775-1783) Even before war erupted, Connecticut passed anti-Tory…

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A Revolutionary Book Designer: Bruce Rogers of New Fairfield

Bruce Rogers was a book designer who settled in New Fairfield. Considered one of the great typographers of his time, his masterpiece was the 1936 Oxford Lectern Bible.

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John F. Weir, Roger Sherman, ca. 1902

Roger Sherman, Revolutionary and Dedicated Public Servant

An author of the Connecticut Compromise, Roger Sherman is also the only person to have signed all four of the most significant documents in our nation’s early history.

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Nathan Starr Cutlass

Nathan Starr’s Cutlass Fought the War of 1812

On May 18, 1808, the Navy Agent Joseph Hull of New London negotiated a contract with Nathan Starr of Middletown for 2,000 cutlasses.

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Image of Soldiers Memorial, Company B, 29th Regiment, Connecticut Volunteers

Connecticut’s Black Civil War Regiment

“If you win freedom and citizenship, we shall share your freedom and citizenship.” With these words, abolitionist Frederick Douglass reminded African American soldiers from Connecticut that they fought for the hopes of many.

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Kaman Aircraft, 1949

Helicopters, Guitars, and Guide Dogs: The Revolutionary Mind of Charles Kaman

Charles Kaman, an inventor and aviation pioneer, managed to combine…

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David Bushnell and his Revolutionary Submarine

How a farmer’s son became the Father of Submarine Warfare during the American Revolution.

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Levi B. Frost House, Southington

The Frost House Once Offered Travelers a Warm Welcome

On Marion Avenue in the southwest corner of Southington sits…

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Connecticut in the French and Indian War

Connecticut troops sustained demoralizing losses before a reinvigorated British military turned the tide of the French and Indian War.

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New Haven: What Was Everyday Life Like During the Civil War?

Questions? We get a lot of them and some of…

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Detail from the map Colony of Connecticut in North-America by Moses Park

East Haven’s Revolutionary Salt Works

East Haven’s Amos Morris helped supply Americans with salt (essential for preserving food) during critical shortages brought on by the American Revolution.

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J.O. Davidson, Battle of Port Hudson

Connecticut’s Naval Contributions to the Civil War

From makers of gun boats to bakers of ship biscuits, companies across the Nutmeg state helped keep the Union navy afloat while sea-savvy leaders and sailors from the state kept it in fighting form.

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War and Defense

From the Pequot War of 1637, and its tragic consequences…

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Brick School, Warren

Warren

The town of Warren is located the foothills of the…

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Israel Putnam: A Youthful Trailblazer Turned Colonial Militiaman

Israel Putnam served with distinction in the Seven Years’ War and in the Revolutionary War, particularly at the Battle of Bunker Hill.

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Detail of the French army's map of its route across Connecticut in Bolton

Site Lines: Mapping Rochambeau’s March across Connecticut

Moving troops and materiel over long distances during the Revolutionary War required accurate maps, most of which were in British hands, until French allies came to the rebelling colonists’ aid.

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Borough of Stonington

Settled in 1752, Stonington became a fishing, shipbuilding, whaling, and sealing center and survived attacks during both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.

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Israel Putnam: A Youthful Trailblazer Turned Colonial Militiaman

Israel Putnam served with distinction in the Seven Years’ War and in the Revolutionary War, particularly at the Battle of Bunker Hill.

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Pulling Down the Statue of King George II, New York City

Mariann Wolcott and Ralph Earl – Opposites Come Together and Make History

The story of Mariann Wolcott and Ralph Earl captures much of the complexity the Revolutionary War brought to the lives and interactions of ordinary citizens.

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Timothy Dwight Provides Religious, Military, and Educational Services for a Young Country

Timothy Dwight was an influential preacher, poet, and educator who served as a chaplain during the Revolutionary War and later as the president of Yale College.

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Caleb Brewster and the Culper Spy Ring

Caleb Brewster used his knowledge of Long Island Sound to serve as a member of the Culper Spy Ring during the Revolutionary War.

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Sarah Trumbull with a Spaniel by John Trumbull

American Painter John Trumbull Born – Today in History: June 6

On June 6, 1756, John Trumbull, painter, architect, and author,…

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A 1908 reenactment of Thomas Hooker’s 1636 landing in Hartford

Colonial Revival Movement Sought Stability during Time of Change

Connecticut’s past provided refuge from pressures of modern life.

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A plan of the first Society in Lebanon

Exploring Early Connecticut Mapmaking

Renderings of the terrain served a variety of purposes, from supporting colonists’ land claims as well as tribal counterclaims to settling religious disputes and even adorning the homes of the well-off.

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First American Medicine Patent – Today in History: April 30

On April 30, 1796, Samuel Lee Jr. of Windham, Connecticut,…

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A receipt for two prints of John Trumbull paintings

Jeremiah Wadsworth, “foremost in every enterprise”

Had this Hartford merchant lived in another era, his wealth and influence might have made him comparable to a 19th-century financial tycoon or a 20th-century venture capitalist.

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Ralph Earl, The Battle of Lexington, April 19th, 1775 etched by Amos Doolittle

News From Lexington: Contemporary Views of the Opening Battles of the American Revolution

A rare set of prints by New Haven printer Amos Doolittle depicts the momentous events of April 19, 1775.

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Postcard of New London Bridge on Thames River, New London, Conn.

I-95 Reaches New London

The arrival of I-95 to New London brought tremendous change to the city’s infrastructure, as well as to its businesses and neighborhoods.

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Anna Louise James seated, with a cat on her lap

Miss James, First Woman Pharmacist in CT Right in Old Saybrook

Remembering Anna Louise James, the first woman pharmacist in the state of Connecticut.

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Shipbuilding at Gildersleeve Ship Construction Co., Portland

The Gildersleeve Shipbuilding Legacy in Portland

The town of Portland has a rich history of shipbuilding….

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Valley Forge, 1777

A Connecticut Slave in George Washington’s Army

Nero Hawley, born into slavery in Connecticut in the 18th…

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Colonel William Douglas

William Douglas: A Colonial Hero’s Sacrifice

William Douglas was a successful merchant and military leader who…

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Timothy Dwight

Timothy Dwight Dies – Today in History: January 11

On January 11, 1817, Timothy Dwight (theologian, educator, poet, and…

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Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys

Ethan Allen Born – Today in History: January 10

On January 10, 1738, future hero of the Revolutionary War…

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Morris Academy

Hidden Nearby: The Morris Academy

Rare for his time, educator James Morris accepted both boys and girls as students.

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Trumbull Gallery

Yale University Art Gallery – Today in History: October 25

On October 25, 1832, the Trumbull Gallery at Yale opened…

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View on the Erie Canal

Benjamin Wright: The Father of American Civil Engineering

Benjamin Wright helped build transportation and canal systems in the…

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Asaph Hall, August 1899

Goshen’s Asaph Hall Becomes an Astronomical Success

Asaph Hall was a world-famous astronomer and mathematician from Goshen….

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Unveiling of the Grant Memorial Tablet – Today in History: October 4

On October 4th, 1916, the Ulysses Simpson Grant Memorial Tablet…

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Jonathan Trumbull, Sr.

Governor Jonathan Trumbull Dies – Today in History: August 17

On August 17, 1785, Connecticut’s first governor, Jonathan Trumbull, died….

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U.S. Frigate Constitution, Isaac Hull, Esqr., commander

Fame and Infamy for the Hulls of Derby

Two Connecticut men, uncle and nephew, had starring roles—one in defeat and one in victory—during the War of 1812.

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Burning of Fairfield

British Burn Fairfield – Today in History: July 7

On July 7, 1779, during the Revolutionary War, the British…

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Benedict Arnold house, New Haven

Benedict Arnold died in London, England – Today in History: June 14

On June 14, 1801, Revolutionary War general and traitor Benedict…

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Richard Brooks, Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell Launched – Today in History: June 13

On June 13, 1776, the ship Oliver Cromwell, built by…

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Leffingwell Inn, Norwichtown

Christopher Leffingwell Born – Today in History: June 11

On June 11, 1734, businessman and civic leader Christopher Leffingwell…

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Benedict Arnold: America’s Most Famous Traitor

Benedict Arnold of Norwich was one of the great Continental army heroes of the American Revolution before committing treason and joining the British army.

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Colonel William Douglas

William Douglas: A Colonial Hero’s Sacrifice

William Douglas was a successful merchant and military leader who…

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Timothy Dwight

Timothy Dwight Dies – Today in History: January 11

On January 11, 1817, Timothy Dwight (theologian, educator, poet, and…

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Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys

Ethan Allen Born – Today in History: January 10

On January 10, 1738, future hero of the Revolutionary War…

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Thomas Jefferson and the Embargo of 1807

Connecticut and the Embargo Act of 1807

The Embargo Act of 1807 stifled Connecticut trade with Europe, but ultimately boosted local manufacturing.

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Nathan Hale Statue, Hartford

Nathan Hale Hanged in New York – Today in History: September 22

On September 22, 1776, the British hanged Revolutionary War soldier…

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Connecticut Pin Makers

For the latter half of the 19th century and for much of the 20th, Connecticut led the nation in pin production.

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Fort Griswold, 1781

Fort Griswold Attacked – Today in History: September 6

On September 6, 1781, British forces overtook Fort Griswold and,…

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Mead Memorial Park, New Canaan

Summer Crowds Flocked to New Canaan and Stayed

Like many towns in Connecticut, New Canaan owes much of…

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Mariann Wolcott

Map: Connecticut Women in History (more to come…)

From forging Revolutionary War ammunition to running newspapers, patenting new…

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Kimberly Mansion, Glastonbury

The Smith Sisters, Their Cows, and Women’s Rights in Glastonbury

By refusing to pay unfair taxes, these siblings became national symbols of discrimination suffered by women and of the struggle of the individual against government.

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Little Bethel AME Church, 44 Lake Avenue, Greenwich

Site Lines: Fortresses of Faith, Agents of Change

Black churches, including the earliest ones in Connecticut, have long been at the forefront in the battle for social progress and equality.

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Illustration of Hebron by John Warner Barber

Changing Sentiments on Slavery in Colonial Hebron

Residents of Hebron rescued local slaves Lowis and Cesar Peters, and their children, from South Carolina slave traders. After emancipation, the rescued family became farmers in town.

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Detail from a map of Hayt

Ebenezer Bassett’s Historic Journey

This educator, activist, and associate of Frederick Douglass served the US as its first African American ambassador.

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Valley Forge, 1777

A Connecticut Slave in George Washington’s Army

Nero Hawley, born into slavery in Connecticut in the 18th…

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Advertisement for Isaac Doolittle's bell foundry

Early Church Bell Founders

Church bells served many important functions in early New England. Consequently, skilled bellfounders in Connecticut found themselves in high demand.

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John Fitch's steamboat model

John Fitch Born – Today in History: January 21

On January 21, 1743, John Fitch, an inventor and pioneer…

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Attributed to Osbert Burr Loomis, Nancy Toney, oil on canvas

Nancy Toney’s Lifetime in Slavery

From scant evidence, including a portrait, gravestone, census data, and will, a partial image of a Connecticut life lived in slavery emerges.

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Workers on the Charter farm on Crystal Lake Road, Ellington

William Pinney Does It All for Ellington

William N. Pinney’s life was one of public service. A…

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Ralph Earl, Oliver Wolcott

Oliver Wolcott Dies – Today in History: December 1

On December 1, 1797, signer of the Declaration of Independence…

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The Articles of Confederation: America’s First Constitution

The Articles of Confederation loosely served as the nation’s first formal governing document, until ultimately being replaced by the US Constitution.

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New-Gate Prison courtyard

Notorious New-Gate Prison

A failed Simsbury copper mine is now a national historic landmark in East Granby.

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The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial Tablet

The Connecticut Division of the Sons of Veterans, USA, commissioned a memorial tablet to Ulysses S. Grant who led Union forces during the Civil War, became the eighteenth president of the United States, and whose ancestors had numerous ties to Connecticut.

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Map of the Freedom Trail Sites

Site Lines: Connecticut’s Freedom Trail

Sites along the Connecticut Freedom Trail mark key events in the quest to achieve freedom and social equality for African Americans in the state.

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Needlework by Prudence Punderson

Prudence Punderson, Ordinary Woman, Extraordinary Artist: Needlework in Connecticut

Completed in the 1700s, “The First, Second and Last Scene of Mortality” is considered to be one of the most spectacular pieces of needlework in US history.

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Deep River Drum Corps

The World’s Record for the Largest Muster – Who Knew?

…that Deep River holds the distinction of hosting the largest…

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Henry Austin, Grove Street Cemetery Entrance, 1845, New Haven

An Overview of Connecticut’s Outdoor Sculpture

Public sculpture has punctuated the state for three centuries, reflecting the values of our communities, their times, and their funders.

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Map of the state of Connecticut showing Indian trails, villages and sachemdoms

Andover to Woodstock: How Connecticut Ended Up with 169 Towns

Religious mandates, the difficulties of colonial-era travel, and industrialization are a few of the forces that gave rise to the proliferation of towns in our state.

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Connecticut, from the Best Authorities

Stamford’s Three-Gun Armada

During the Revolutionary War, American privateers utilized armed whaling boats…

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Front view of John Browns birthplace, Torrington

Hidden Nearby: John Brown’s Torrington Birthplace

Ruins are all that remain of the birthplace of this transformative figure in US history.

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Hannah Bunce Watson: One of America’s First Female Publishers

Hannah Bunce Watson was one of the first female publishers in America. Her leadership helped the Hartford Courant) survive one of the most challenging times in its history.

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Map of the West Indies, 1717

Connecticut and the West Indies: Sugar Spurs Trans-Atlantic Trade

This profitable exchange brought wealth and sought-after goods to the state but came at the price of supporting slavery in the bargain.

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Manumission document for slave Bristow, from Thomas Hart Hooker, Hartford

Gradual Emancipation Reflected the Struggle of Some to Envision Black Freedom

Connecticut enacted gradual emancipation in 1784 but the abolition of slavery would not occur until 1848.

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Major General Benedict Arnold

Benedict Arnold

Benedict Arnold (1741-1801) Once lauded for heroism, Norwich-born Benedict Arnold…

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Oliver Wolcott

Oliver Wolcott

Oliver Wolcott (1726-1797) Oliver Wolcott was a Revolutionary War hero…

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Illustration of "The Connecticut Courant", Oct. 29, 1764

The Oldest Continuously Published Newspaper – Today in History: October 29

On October 29, 1764, New Haven printer Thomas Green established…

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Connecticut Courant building

The Oldest US Newspaper in Continuous Publication

The Hartford Courant is a source for news and history…

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Benedict Arnold

Benedict Arnold Turns and Burns New London

September 6, 1781 was a brutal and terrifying day for Connecticut citizens living on both sides of New London harbor, along the Thames River.

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David Humphreys

David Humphreys, Soldier, Statesman, and Agricultural Innovator

Despite an accomplished political career, this Derby-born gentleman of means is best remembered for introducing Merino sheep to North America.

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Shaker advertisement to board horses, 1884

Enfield’s Shaker Legacy

Shaking Quakers settled in Enfield and created the packaged seed business.

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Joel Barlow

The Hartford Wits

Eventually taking the name the “Hartford Wits,” some of the most influential figures of the 18th century got together to write poetry that documented the state of the times.

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Samuel Colt…and Sewing Machines?

The National Museum of American History explains how a revolver, sewing machine, bicycle, and early-model electric automobile are connected.

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Advertisement for July 4th balloon flight

Silas Brooks, Balloonist

This Connecticut native earned fame as a crowd-pleasing musician, showman, and aeronaut.

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Captain Nathaniel Shaw Mansion, New London

New London’s Sound Defense

The use of privateers to supplement naval forces and wage…

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Map of The Part of Pennsylvania that Lies Between the Forks of the Susquehannah, Divided Into Townships

The Susquehanna Settlers

In 1753, amidst a flurry of land speculation and westward…

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George Washington Slept Here

George Washington Slept Here (Just Perhaps Not Well)

Within the heritage tourism industry, it is not uncommon to…

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Echoes of the Old World: The Architectural Legacy of Ithiel Town

Ithiel Town was one of the first professional architects in Connecticut and one of the first to introduce the architectural styles of Europe to the United States.

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Detail of a bed curtain attributed to Priscilla Kingsbury

The Decorative Arts of Connecticut

Decorative Arts—or, household furnishings— reveal past lifestyles and showcase the state’s best-known craftspeople.

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Am I not a man and a brother?

Early Anti-slavery Advocates in 18th-century Connecticut

Ideals advanced during the American Revolution inspired many of the state’s religious and political leaders to question and oppose slavery in the late 1700s.

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The Long, Ambiguous History of Connecticut’s Blue Laws

Connecticut’s blue laws are a series of laws based on puritan values that restrict or ban certain “morally questionable” activities on days of worship or rest.

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Camp à Contorbery, le 7 Novembre, 10 milles de Windham

Map – Rochambeau’s Camp at Canterbury

This map, “Camp à Contorbery, le 7 Novembre, 10 milles…

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Count de Rochambeau - French general of the land forces in America reviewing the French troops

Rochambeau Returns Over and Over to Andover

Jean-Baptiste-Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau, was a French nobleman…

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Putting History on the Map

While maps serve a utilitarian function at the time of their production, years later they become snapshots in time as displays of the personal and collective memories of those who designed them. Such is the case with maps drawn by James Wadsworth and Douglas Grant Mitchell.

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The Adventure of a Lifetime: John Ledyard and Captain Cook’s Last Voyage

Published in Hartford in 1783, this book by a Groton-born traveler captured a young nation’s imagination with its tales of discovery.

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Tomlinson Cottage, Retreat for the Insane, Hartford

Hartford Retreat for the Insane Advanced Improved Standards of Care

In the 1800s, this Connecticut hospital stood at the forefront of medical practice in the US in its new approaches to the treatment of mental illness.

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Walnut Grove, Hammond Estate, Waterford

“Gentleman’s Farming” Comes to Waterford

Walnut Grove is the former estate of the Hammond family,…

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Somers' prison opening day

Osborn Correctional Institution

When the Connecticut Correctional Institution opened in Somers in 1963,…

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Jonathan Trumbull

Jonathan Trumbull

Jonathan Trumbull, Sr. (1710-1785) Jonathan Trumbull was a merchant and…

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Dedication of the New State Capitol, 1876

Imagining Connecticut

Who are we?  What traditions and accomplishments define us as…

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Fort Griswold

Fort Griswold and the Battle of Groton Heights 1781

East of the Thames River, on Groton Heights, Fort Griswold…

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Putnam’s Cave or Wolf Den

The Last Wolf in Connecticut

There are many versions of the story of Israel Putnam and the wolf, but the original is found in a book first published in Hartford in 1788 while Putnam was still alive.

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The Hermitage, Peter's Rock

Peter’s Rock: North Haven History with a View

Peter’s Rock, reaching a height of 373 feet above sea…

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Scoville Library, Salisbury

The Scoville Memorial Library

The first publicly funded library in the US continues to serve the town of Salisbury.

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Colonel John Trumbull

John Trumbull

John Trumbull (1756-1843) John Trumbull was an artist whose paintings…

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Eli Terry

Eli Terry

Eli Terry, Sr. (1772-1852) Eli Terry is considered the father…

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Historic photo of the Ebenezer Avery House, Groton

The Ebenezer Avery House – Who Knew?

…that the Ebenezer Avery House on the grounds of Fort…

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The Story Trail of Voices

Mohegan history and religion have been preserved by many different voices in many different families through Mohegan Oral Tradition. However, since before the American Revolution, four women in particular have passed on Mohegan stories.

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Detail of Connecticut and Parts Adjacent, 1780

Levi Pease, Stage Route and Transportation Innovator

Somers, Connecticut, a small town near the state’s border with…

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New Haven Green

The Connecticut Town Green

Considered a quintessential feature of the New England landscape, town greens weren’t always the peaceful, park-like spaces we treasure today.

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Silas Deane

Silas Deane

Silas Deane (1737-1789) Silas Deane was a politician and diplomat…

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Maj. Gen. Israel Putnam

Israel Putnam

Israel Putnam (1718-1790) Israel Putnam, a patriot and Revolutionary War…

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Detail of Nathan Hale bronze sculpture by Frederick William MacMonnies

Nathan Hale

Nathan Hale (1755-1776) Nathan Hale was a Connecticut patriot and…

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Nelson Augustus Moore painting outdoors

A Photographer with a Painter’s Eye: The Story of Nelson Augustus Moore

Kensington-born Moore took “on the spot” photographs that documented life and events during the 1850s and 1860s.

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Lantern Hill

Breaking the Myth of the Unmanaged Landscape

Evidence of early Native land use is etched into the landscape and preserved in oral tradition as well as the historical and archaeological records. This is in direct contradiction to a persistent myth of colonialism: that European settlers encountered a virgin landscape free of human intervention and ripe for development.

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Camp a Danbury le 23 Octobre 11 milles de Salem

Map – Rochambeau’s Camp at Danbury

This map, “Camp a Danbury le 23 Octobre 11 milles…

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Camp à East Hartford, le 29 Octobre, 12 milles 1/2 de Farmingtown

Map – Rochambeau’s Camp at East Hartford

This map, “Camp à East Hartford, le 29 Octobre, 12…

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Camp à Walen-Town, le 8 Novembre, 10 milles de Contorbery

Map – Rochambeau’s Camp at Voluntown

This map, “Camp à Walen-Town, le 8 Novembre, 10 milles…

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Camp à Farmington le 28 Octobre, 13 milles de Barn's Tavern

Map – Rochambeau’s Camp at Farmington

This map, “Camp à Farmington le 28 Octobre, 13 milles…

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Camp à Windham, le 5 Novembre, 16 milles 1/2 de Bolton

Map – Rochambeau’s Camp at Windham

This map, “Camp à Windham, le 5 Novembre, 16 milles…

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John Randall House, North Stonington

North Stonington’s Randall House, Nothing Ordinary about It

Randall’s Ordinary was the dream of Connecticut natives William and…

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Whitneyville Armory, Whitney's Improved Fire-Arms, from an advertisement, ca. 1862

The Whitney Armory Helps Progress in Hamden

Eli Whitney is famous for the cotton gin. His invention…

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Site of the Revolutionary War Foundry, Salisbury

Salisbury Iron Forged Early Industry

Connecticut’s bucolic northwest corner, with its Taconic Range, Berkshire Hills, and pastoral valleys, harbored a major iron industry in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Ralph Earl, A View of the Town of Concord etched by Amos Doolittle

Ralph Earl: Portrait of an Early American Artist

Among the number of 18th-century artists who resided in Bolton…

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Ad announcing reward for runaway slave, 1803

Slavery and Abolition

Slavery in Connecticut dates as far back as the mid-1600s….

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Hervey Brooks's pottery wheel

Business and Industry

From Connecticut’s earliest agricultural commerce through the might of the…

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Christ Episcopal Church and Tashua Burial Ground, Trumbull

Trumbull

The town of Trumbull is located in Fairfield County in…

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The Taft School, Watertown

Watertown

Watertown is located in Litchfield County in the Central Naugatuck…

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Wilton Town Hall

Wilton

The town of Wilton is located in Fairfield County in…

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Putnam

The Windham County town of Putnam is located in the…

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Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum, Norwalk

Norwalk

The city of Norwalk, located in Fairfield County, is in…

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Matthew Curtiss House

Newtown

The town of Newtown is located in Fairfield County in…

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Former Town Hall, Morris

Morris

The town of Morris is located in Litchfield County in…

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Taft Tunnel, Lisbon

Lisbon

Named after Portugal’s capital city, the New London County town…

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Groton

The New London County town of Groton sits between the…

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Great River Park, East Hartford

East Hartford

The Hartford County town of East Hartford is located on…

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Old New-Gate Prison

East Granby

Bisected by the Metacomet Ridge with the Farmington River along…

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Philip Johnson's Glass House, New Canaan

New Canaan

The town of New Canaan is located in Fairfield County…

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Artist J. Alden Weir's farm, Ridgefield

Ridgefield

The town of Ridgefield, located in Fairfield County, is in…

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Putnam Memorial State Park, Redding

Redding

Redding, in Fairfield County, is located in southwestern Connecticut. Incorporated…

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Gurdon Bill Store, Ledyard

Ledyard

The town of Ledyard, located New London County, sits along…

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Lebanon

The town of Lebanon, located in New London County, is…

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Henry Whitfield State Museum, Guilford

Guilford

Guilford, in New Haven County, is located in southern Connecticut…

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Putnam Cottage (Knapp Tavern), Greenwich

Greenwich

The town of Greenwich, located in Fairfield County, is at…

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Welles Chapman Tavern, Glastonbury

Glastonbury

The town of Glastonbury, located in Hartford County, is in…

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David Ogden House & Gardens, Fairfield

Fairfield

The town of Fairfield, located in Fairfield County, is in…

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John & Mary Rider House

Danbury

Danbury, in Fairfield County, is located in southwest Connecticut, on…

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Israel Putnam Monument, Brooklyn

Brooklyn

The town of Brooklyn, in Windham County, is located in…

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Ansonia

The city of Ansonia, located in New Haven County on…

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Railroad Trestle over the Housatonic River, Derby

Derby

The city of Derby, located in New Haven County, is…

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Noah Webster the schoolmaster of the republic, ca. 1891

Noah Webster and the Dream of a Common Language

Best remembered for the dictionary that now bears his name, Noah Webster played a pivotal role in shaping the young nation’s political and social identity.

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Bradley Field, Windsor Locks

Bradley International Airport Transforms Windsor Locks into Regional Gateway

Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks is Connecticut’s largest airport and the second largest in New England.

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A return of the number of inhabitants in the State of Connecticut

Connecticut’s Black Governors

For approximately one hundred years, Connecticut’s “Black Governors” were used by white authorities to help maintain order among the black population.

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Danbury Hangings: The Executions of Anthony and Amos

The executions of Anthony and Amos Adams in Danbury speak to the fears and racial tensions prevalent in early American culture.

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The “Red Scare” in Connecticut

The Palmer Raids, launched in Connecticut in 1919, were part of the paranoia known as the “Red Scare” that resulted in numerous civil rights violations committed by law enforcement officials.

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An Orderly & Decent Government: A New State, A New Constitution, 1776-1818

The American Revolution prompted enormous political and social changes in other states, but Connecticut remained a “land of steady habits” until 1817 brought change to state government.

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Making Self-Government Work, 1776-1818

The freedom won in the American Revolution did not spread to African Americans. The Constitution of 1818 formed the basis for state government until 1965.

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Searching for the Common Good, 1776-1818

During the American Revolution, loyalists were common in Connecticut. Those sympathetic to the patriot cause helped provide for the Continental army.

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Making Self-Government Work, 1866-1887

The late 1800s witnessed significant challenges to Connecticut’s voting and taxation laws.

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Significant Events & Developments, 1776-1818

With its limited supply of fertile land either occupied or exhausted, one of Connecticut’s principal exports in the post-Revolutionary years was people.

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Drawing from Remarkable Apparitions, and Ghost-Stories, 1849

The Ghost Ship of New Haven Sets Sail Shrouded in Mystery

Tales of a spectral ship seen sailing in the skies above New Haven have haunted Connecticut’s imagination since the late 1640s.

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Enoch Smith Woods, Colonel Thomas Knowlton

Thomas Knowlton: A Small Town’s National Hero

Thomas Knowlton is arguably Ashford’s most widely recognized war hero….

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Patent Model for the Manufacture of Rubber Fabrics, Charles Goodyear, 1844

Charles Goodyear’s Machine for Making Rubber Fabrics

Credited with discovering the vulcanization process that fortified rubber against extreme temperature changes, Charles Goodyear received several patents over his lifetime, including one for a machine that made rubber fabrics.

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The Old State House, Hartford

Jackson v. Bulloch and the End of Slavery in Connecticut

Nancy Jackson, a Georgia-born slave living in Hartford, sued for her freedom in 1837. Her victory helped further the abolitionist cause in a state slowly moving toward outlawing slavery.

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Detail from the broadside an "Address to Miss Phillis Wheatly" composed by Jupiter Hammon

Hartford Publishes the First Literary Work by an African American – Who Knew?

…that Jupiter Hammon, who endured life-long enslavement became the first…

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Emergence of Modern America

Emergence of Modern America (1890–1930) The arrival of the 20th…

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Patent Model for the Manufacture of Rubber Fabrics, Charles Goodyear, 1844

Expansion and Reform

Expansion and Reform (1801–1861) The early 19th century witnessed America…

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John Trumbull, The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker's Hill, June 17,1775

Revolution and the New Nation

Revolution and the New Nation (1754–1820s) Connecticut played a vital…

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The White Pine Acts – Who Knew?

The British government made it illegal for colonials to cut down white pine trees over 24 inches in diameter—preserving the trees for use as masts on British naval ships.

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Detail from A Map of the Connecticut Western Reserve, from actual Survey, surveyed by Seth Pease

New Connecticut on Lake Erie: Connecticut’s Western Reserve

If you drive through the area of Ohio still called the Western Reserve today, you will find towns named Norwich, Saybrook, New London, Litchfield, Mansfield, and Plymouth.

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Liberty Pole marker on East Street North, Goshen

Hidden Nearby: Goshen’s Liberty Pole

A marker on East Street North in nearby Goshen, Connecticut, allows us a window on to past celebrations of American freedoms and liberties

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Theodate posing for painter Robert Brandegee in 1902

Theodate Pope Riddle: Connecticut’s Pioneering Woman Architect

Despite opposition from a male-dominated profession and a lack of formal training, Theodate Pope Riddle became a pioneering female architect.

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North and South: The Legacy of Eli Whitney

After studying to become a lawyer, Eli Whitney actually helped further American industrial production methods through his numerous clever inventions.

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Mayor's Council Russian Class

A Month-Long Look at Immigration

Immigration plays such a vital role in the story of…

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The Importance of Being Puritan: Church and State in Colonial Connecticut

In the sixteenth century, Connecticut Protestants wanted to cleanse the church of what they saw as corruption, and to return to the simplicity and purity of early Christian worship.

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Wallace Nutting, The Shadow of the Blossoms

Past Perfect: Wallace Nutting Invents an Ideal Olde New England

In the early 1900s consumers bought photographs, furniture, and books from a former minister who skillfully sold the fantasy of simpler times as an antidote to modern life.

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Soldier, Patriot, and Politician: The Life of Oliver Wolcott

Oliver Wolcott served in military in the Seven Years’ War and the American Revolution, but was also a popular member of the Continental Congress and governor of Connecticut.

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Venture Smith's headstone

Venture Smith, from Slavery to Freedom

Smith’s account sheds light on the experience of enslaved and free blacks in 18th-century Connecticut.

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“Free Bobby, Free Ericka”: The New Haven Black Panther Trials

In 1969, the Black Panther Trials brought national attention to New Haven as prosecutors charged members of the radical movement with murdering one of their own.

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American Cookery, or, The Art of Dressing Viands, Fish, Poultry, and Vegetables by Amelia Simmons

Amelia Simmons Adds a Uniquely American Flavor to Cooking

In 1796, Amelia Simmons authored American Cookery—believed to be the first cookbook authored by an American published in the United States.

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English barn, Ashford

Barn Design in Connecticut

Most barns still on the Northeast landscape are New England-style barns from the 19th century and later.

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Detail from Map of Windham County, Connecticut

The Pike Family Lived a Life of Dyeing

The history of textile manufacturing in eastern Connecticut is well…

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Connecticut Shore, Winter by John Henry Twachtman

Connecticut and American Impressionism

French Impressionists celebrated their new modern lives, but American Impressionists looked instead to a New England countryside like that in Connecticut for evidence of a stable, timeless order beneath the dazzle of the ephemeral.

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Cheney Brothers Mills

The Cheney Brothers’ Rise in the Silk Industry

Building a business on the back of an insect may seem foolish but for Manchester’s Cheney Brothers silk mill, it became the ticket to global success.

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Detail from the map View of Windsor Locks, Conn. 1877

The Windsor Economy: A River Ran Through It

Windsor’s location on the Connecticut River shaped the area’s development…

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Bear Mountain, Salisbury

Salisbury

The town of Salisbury, located in Litchfield County, is the…

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