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Women


Harriet Beecher Stowe

The Most Famous American in the World

In 1853, in cities and villages across Britain and Europe, throngs of admirers pushed and shoved to catch a glimpse of a barely 5-foot-tall writer from America whose best-selling novel had taken slavery to task.

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The Cottage Girl by Nancy Hale a pupil of Sarah Pierce's school

Educator Sarah Pierce Born – Today in History: June 26

June 26, 2020 • Education, Litchfield, Women

On June 26, 1767, pioneering educator Sarah Pierce was born…

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Votes for A Woman: Sara Buek Crawford

As Connecticut’s first female statewide elected official and first female Secretary of State, Sara Crawford broke barriers for women throughout her career.

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Adeline Gray at the Pioneer Parachute Company, Manchester

First Human Test of a Nylon Parachute – Today in History: June 6

On June 6, 1942, Adeline Gray made the first jump…

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Helen Keller

Helen Keller Dies – Today in History: June 1

On June 1, 1968, American author, political activist, and lecturer…

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Mary Hall: Connecticut’s First Female Attorney

Writer and suffragist Mary Hall developed an interest in the law after hearing John Hooker speak at a suffragist convention. She studied under Hooker and became Connecticut’s first female attorney.

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Josephine Bennett: Hartford’s City Mother

By linking disparate social and political movements of the early 20th century, activist Josephine Bennett was “intersectional” well before the term was invented.

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The Trailblazing Bessye Bennett

In 1974, nearly one hundred years after Mary Hall became…

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Katharine Hepburn’s Love Affair (with Connecticut)

One of the most popular actresses of the 20th century, Katharine Hepburn was born to prominent parents in Hartford. She lived much of her later life in Old Saybrook.

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First Woman Elected as US State Governor Born – Today in History: May 10

On May 10, 1919, Ella Grasso, née Ella Rosa Giovanna…

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Elizabeth W. Coe Demands the Right of Jury Service

After passage of the 19th Amendment, Elizabeth W. Coe of Waterbury argued that women should be granted the right to serve on jury panels.

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Crisis Management during the American Civil War: The Hartford Soldiers’ Aid Society

The Hartford Soldiers’ Aid Society was one of the most important relief organizations during the Civil War and provided new opportunities for women in the public sphere.

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Vivien Kellems Takes On the IRS

Reformer Vivien Kellems fought her most famous battle against the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) as she sought tax reform for businesses and single people.

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The Influence of Woman, Harper's Weekly, 1862

Bridgeport Women Answer the Call – Today in History: April 15

On April 15, 1861, the women of Bridgeport created the…

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The Gettysburg Address and Heroic Fathers Bronze Tablets at the State Capitol

To counter public perceptions that Union women lacked the patriotism found in their Confederate counterparts, in 1927, two different women’s organizations dedicated plaques to commemorate events and service in the Civil War.

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Advertising card of the Dr. Warner’s Caroline Corset

From Bombs to Bras: World War I Conservation Measures Transform the Lives of Women

A shortage of metal during World War I encouraged women’s clothing manufacturers (such as Bridgeport’s Warner Brothers Corset Company) to switch from producing corsets to brassieres.

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Theodate posing for painter Robert Brandegee in 1902

Theodate Pope Riddle: Connecticut’s Pioneering Woman Architect

Despite opposition from a male-dominated profession and a lack of formal training, Theodate Pope Riddle became a pioneering female architect.

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Video – Sophie Tucker Tribute Film

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to celebrated singer and actress, and long-time Hartford resident, Sophie Tucker.

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Home Economics Club, Hartford Public High School

Much Good Might be Accomplished: Catharine Esther Beecher and the Pursuit of Domestic Economy

March 27, 2020 • Education, Women

Thanks to this 19th-century educator and reformer, home economics is standard fare in schools today.

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Video – Emily Dunning Barringer Tribute Film

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to long-time New Canaan resident, Dr. Emily Barringer, the first female ambulance surgeon and first female physician in the nation to secure a surgical residency.

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Connecticut Suffragists, 1919

Connecticut Suffragists 1919

Despite the fact that the women in this well-known photograph…

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Triangle Shirtwaist Fire: Connecticut Lessons from a Tragedy

While the Triangle Shirtwaist fire in New York City is one of the most famous tragedies behind the organized labor movement, Connecticut had its share of equally dangerous work environments in the early 20th century. Many of them inspired Connecticut Workers to organize.

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Southern New England Telephone Company Operator School

Connecticut’s First Female Telephone Operator – Today in History: March 24

On March 24, 1879, Marjorie Gray became Connecticut’s first female…

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Anna E. Dickinson

Anna Elizabeth Dickinson at Touro Hall – Today in History: March 24

On March 24, 1863, Anna Elizabeth Dickinson, a 20-year-old Quaker…

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Waterbury’s Radium Girls

In the early 20th century, girls working at the Waterbury Clock Company faced death and disease from exposure to radium in the workplace.

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A Woman Ahead of Her Time: Mabel Osgood Wright

This writer and photographer founded the Connecticut Audubon Society and created Fairfield’s Birdcraft Sanctuary.

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Unitarian Church, Brooklyn

Celia Burleigh, Connecticut’s First Female Minister

March 15, 2020 • Belief, Brooklyn, Women

In 1871, Celia Burleigh, a life-long activist and reformer, became…

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Sexton family home, now the Ellington Historical Society

Nellie McKnight Promotes History and Literacy throughout Ellington

March 13, 2020 • Education, Ellington, Women, Work

Nellie McKnight was a teacher, librarian, and historian who served…

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Are you a goop? by Caroline Hewins

The Public Library Movement: Caroline Hewins Makes Room for Young Readers

March 13, 2020 • Hartford, Social Movements, Women

This Hartford librarian played a leading role in national efforts to transform libraries from private, limited-membership institutions into public centers that welcomed patrons from all walks of life.

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Connecticut Agricultural College coeds gathering maple sap for war effort

A New Source of Farm Labor Crops Up in Wartime

During times of war, in Connecticut, as in many other states, women became an increasingly important resource in food production.

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Lydia Sherman: The Derby Poisoner

Lydia Sherman confessed to killing three husbands and four children, but it is believed that the total number of her victims may be much higher.

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Florence Wald

The First Hospice – Who Knew?

…that the first hospice home-care program in the United States…

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Detail from the front page of The Woman Voter's Bulletin, 1923

A Day for Women – Today in History: March 8

Today, March 8, is International Women’s Day. First observed in…

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Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Best remembered for her short story “The Yellow Wallpaper,” this Hartford author’s larger legacy is a life dedicated to women’s issues and social reform.

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Assembly of parachute flare casings

Munitions Assembly Line 1943

The women and factory depicted in this picture are unknown,…

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Looking Back: Tempest Tossed, the Story of Isabella Beecher Hooker

Isabella Beecher was a suffragist and spiritualist who shunned traditional female roles while alienating large parts of her famous family during her brother’s adultery scandal.

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Clare Boothe Luce Changed Perceptions about Women in Business and Politics

Clare Boothe Luce became the first woman to represent Connecticut in the US House of Representatives and later became an ambassador to Italy.

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Illustration of a woman on horse, woodcut

Sarah Kemble Knight’s Journey through Colonial Connecticut

In 1704, when long distance travel was rare and roads crude, a Boston woman journeyed by horseback to New York City and recorded her views of Connecticut along the way.

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Marian Anderson with (on left) Governor Chester Bowles and W.C. Handy

Black History Month – Marian Anderson

She performed in concert halls where blacks could not be seated, traveled to performances in segregated Jim Crow railroad cars, and, despite it, emerged as one of the great singers of the 20th century.

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Gwen Reed, circa 1950's

Actress Gwen Reed Best Remembered for Dedication to Childhood Literacy

Gwen Reed was an actress and educational advocate who grew…

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Mary and Eliza Freeman Houses, Bridgeport, photograph ca. 1998

Mary and Eliza Freeman Houses

Houses owned by Mary and Eliza Freeman are the only remnants of “Little Liberia,” a settlement of free African Americans in Bridgeport, Connecticut, that began in 1831 and reached its highest population just prior to the outbreak of the Civil War.

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Hannah Bunce Watson: One of America’s First Female Publishers

Hannah Bunce Watson was one of the first female publishers in America. Her leadership helped the Hartford Courant) survive one of the most challenging times in its history.

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Attributed to Osbert Burr Loomis, Nancy Toney, oil on canvas

Nancy Toney’s Lifetime in Slavery

From scant evidence, including a portrait, gravestone, census data, and will, a partial image of a Connecticut life lived in slavery emerges.

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Dr. Emma Irene Boardman

Dr. E. Irene Boardman Never Stopped Serving the Public

Emma Irene Boardman was born January 17, 1889, in Great…

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Sophie Tucker - World-Telegram photo by Dick DeMarsico

Sophie Tucker, The Last of the Red-Hot Mamas

Hartford’s own leading lady was a lively entertainer whose career spanned over five decades and whose generosity spilled over to various and numerous charities.

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Ella Grasso at the Danbury Fair, ca. 1975-80

America’s First Woman Governor: Ella Grasso, 1919-1981

Born to Italian immigrant parents in Windsor Locks, Grasso held state and federal offices at a time when women politicians were rare.

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Ida Tarbell: The Woman Who Took On Standard Oil

At the end of the 19th century, Ida Tarbell became one of the most famous “muckraking” journalists in America, thanks largely to her investigation of the Standard Oil Company.

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Maria Sanchez and Alejandro La Luz, Puerto Rican spokesmen, Hartford

Maria Sánchez, State Representative and Community Advocate

The first Latina elected to the Connecticut General Assembly started as a grassroots activist for Hartford’s Puerto Rican community.

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A Godmother to Ravensbrück Survivors

Philanthropist Caroline Ferriday aided women whose internment at a German concentration camp during WWII left them scarred, physically as well as psychologically.

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God admonishing his people of their duty, as parents and masters

A Most Unusual Criminal Execution in New London

On December 20, 1786, a crowd gathered behind New London’s…

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America’s First Ordained Woman Minister: Olympia Brown and Bridgeport’s Universalist Church

November 26, 2019 • Belief, Bridgeport, Women

Long-time Bridgeport resident Olympia Brown was the first woman ordained as a minister in the United States and campaigned vigorously for women’s suffrage.

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Hopkins Street Center once known as the Pearl St. Neighborhood House

A Woman Who Developed Tolerance: Leila T. Alexander

November 18, 2019 • War and Defense, Waterbury, Women, World War II

On Saturday, November 18, 1944, at noon after the meeting…

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Election day, Main Street, Hartford

When Elections in Hartford Were a Piece of Cake

Unlike today, in the 18th and 19th centuries, Election Day met with great celebration.

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Needlework by Prudence Punderson

Prudence Punderson, Ordinary Woman, Extraordinary Artist: Needlework in Connecticut

September 16, 2019 • Arts, Preston, Revolutionary War, Women

Completed in the 1700s, “The First, Second and Last Scene of Mortality” is considered to be one of the most spectacular pieces of needlework in US history.

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Nutrition class, Connecticut Agricultural College

From Aprons to Lab Coats: The Art and Science of Home Economics

In 1893 the Storrs Agricultural College (the precursor to the University of Connecticut) began training women in domestic science, the discipline that would later be called home economics.

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Prudence Crandall

Prudence Crandall Fights for Equal Access to Education

A headmistress champions education for African American women and although forced to close her school in 1834, she helped win the battle for generations that followed.

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Catharine Beecher, Champion of Women’s Education

Sister to two of the most famous figures of the 19th century–Harriet Beecher Stowe and Henry Ward Beecher–Catharine Esther Beecher achieved fame in her own right as an educator, reformer, and writer.

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Martha Graham, Connecticut College, and the American Dance Festival

September 3, 2019 • Arts, New London, Women

Martha Hill established the School of the Dance on the campus of the Connecticut College for Women in 1948, and hired such renowned instructors as Martha Graham.

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Elizabeth Fones Winthrop Feake Hallett Helps Found Greenwich

In the middle of the 17th century, Elizabeth Fones Winthrop Feake Hallett played an integral part in purchasing the land that became Greenwich, Connecticut.

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Women Suffrage March

Women Win the Right to Vote

August 18, 2019 • Social Movements, Women

After a decades-long struggle, women in Connecticut and across the US gained a say in government.

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Florence Griswold’s Home: A Story of Perseverance and Community

The Florence Griswold House, once a private residence, also served as a finishing school for girls in the 19th century and the center of the Lyme Art Colony.

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The Allied Market

Washington’s Sister Susie Society

The Sister Susie Society in Washington, Connecticut, started out as a reading circle but became a fundraising and World War I relief organization.

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Rosamond Danielson: Windham County Suffragist and Community Leader

Rosamond Danielson was a respected suffragist, World War I worker, and philanthropist from Putnam Heights

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Civil War Sanitary Commission

Sanitary Fair – Today in History: July 25

On July 25, 1864, the Stamford Ladies Soldiers’ Aid Society…

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Protected: Trolley Campaigners Storm Small Towns and Votes for Women is the Battle Cry

There is no excerpt because this is a protected post.

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Connecticut Votes for Women

Connecticut Suffragists Appeal to the President – Today in History: July 12

July 12, 2019 • Simsbury, Social Movements, Women

On July 12, 1918, Connecticut suffragists—men, women, and children—rallied in…

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Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Charlotte Perkins Gilman Born – Today in History: July 3

On July 3, 1860, Charlotte Anna Perkins (Charlotte Perkins Gilman)…

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Sarah Pierce’s Litchfield Female Academy

June 26, 2019 • Education, Litchfield, Women

While several educational academies existed for girls in the years following the American Revolution, few proved more influential than Sarah Pierce’s Litchfield Female Academy. Over 3,000 young women—and about 120 young men—received instruction at Pierce’s school before it closed in 1833.

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Helen Keller in front of her home at Arcan Ridge, Easton

Helen Keller in Connecticut: The Last Years of a Legendary Crusader

May 31, 2019 • Easton, Education, Women

This internationally known author, political activist, and lecturer made her final home in Easton.

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The Inventive Minds of Connecticut Women: Patents in the 19th Century

In 1809, a Connecticut resident received the first US patent…

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The Girl in White, movie advertisement starring June Allyson as Emily Dunning Barringer

New Canaan’s Pioneering Female Physician

Long-time New Canaan resident Dr. Emily Dunning Barringer was the…

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Vera Buch Weisbord’s “Radical” Life

Vera Wilhelmine Buch Weisbord was a labor activist who helped organize trade unions and strikes that shaped the labor movement of the 1920s and 1930s.

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The health of the child is the power of the nation

Helen F. Boyd Leads the Charge for Better Public Health

A long-time Connecticut resident, Helen F. Boyd Powers was a national advocate for greater public access to nursing and healthcare education.

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Video – Rosalind Russell Tribute Film

Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to Waterbury native Rosalind Russell, the legendary award-winning actress of stage and screen.

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Dr. Mary Moody sitting on her front porch

Dr. Mary B. Moody Challenges Victorian Mores About Women in Medicine

New Haven resident Dr. Mary Moody the first female graduate of the medical school at the University of Buffalo, and the first female member of the American Association of Anatomists.

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Anna Louise James seated, with a cat on her lap

Miss James, First Woman Pharmacist in CT Right in Old Saybrook

Remembering Anna Louise James, the first woman pharmacist in the state of Connecticut.

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Emma Hart Willard: Leader in Women’s Education

Berlin-born Emma Hart Willard used her passion for learning to create new educational opportunities for women and foster the growth of the co-ed system.

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Arrest of White House pickets Catherine Flanagan of Hartford, Connecticut, and Madeleine Watson of Chicago

Women of the Prison Brigade

February 22, 2019 • Social Movements, Women

These women from all walks of life had one thing in common: they had been jailed for demonstrating in support of women’s right to vote.

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History in a Heart

February 12, 2019 • Everyday Life, Hide Featured Image, Women

A set of old Valentine’s Day cards, kept safe in a cloth-covered scrapbook, provide a look back at the sometimes humorous art of expressing heartfelt sentiments.

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Segregation Picket line-Noah Webster School, Hartford

Black History Month Resources

February 1, 2019 • Everyday Life, Social Movements, Women

Dr. Carter G. Woodson, known as the “Father of Black…

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Dr. Emma Irene Boardman

Dr. E. Irene Boardman Never Stopped Serving the Public

Emma Irene Boardman was born January 17, 1889, in Great…

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The Smith Sisters and Their Cows Strike a Blow for Equal Rights – Today in History: January 8

Abigail and Julia Smith of Glastonbury (along with Isabella Beecher Hooker) fought for a woman’s right to speak at town meetings and have a say in government.

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A Godmother to Ravensbrück Survivors

Philanthropist Caroline Ferriday aided women whose internment at a German concentration camp during WWII left them scarred, physically as well as psychologically.

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Chapel, Industrial School for Girls, Middletown

Thanksgiving and Christmas at Long Lane, 1874

In 1874 Superintendent S. N. Rockwell and his wife were…

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American Cookery, or, The Art of Dressing Viands, Fish, Poultry, and Vegetables by Amelia Simmons

Amelia Simmons Adds a Uniquely American Flavor to Cooking

In 1796, Amelia Simmons authored American Cookery—believed to be the first cookbook authored by an American published in the United States.

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Armsmear, Wethersfield Avenue, Hartford

Elizabeth Jarvis Colt Born – Today in History: October 5

October 5, 2018 • Hartford, Samuel Colt, Women

On October 5, 1826, Elizabeth Jarvis was born in Hartford….

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Theodate posing for painter Robert Brandegee in 1902

Theodate Pope Riddle Dies – Today in History: August 30

On August 30, 1946, Theodate Pope Riddle, one of the…

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Mrs. Lydia H. Sigourney

Miss Huntley’s School Opens – Today in History: August 1

August 1, 2018 • Education, Hartford, Literature, Women

On August 1, 1814, a young teacher named Lydia Huntley…

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Katharine Hepburn, standing on the beach, Fenwick. Hurricane of 1938

Katharine Hepburn Born – Today in History: May 12

On May 12, 1907, stage and screen legend Katharine Hepburn…

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Searching for the Common Good, 1929-1964

Organized labor grew strong during wartime while discriminatory practices in housing and education persisted throughout the state.

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Celebrating Civil War Men and Women – Today in History: April 9

Today marks the anniversary of not only one, but two…

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St. Anthony Comstock, the Village nuisance

Connecticut and the Comstock Law

The federal Comstock Law of 1873 made it illegal to…

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Segregation Picket line-Noah Webster School, Hartford

Black History Month Resources

February 1, 2018 • Everyday Life, Social Movements, Women

Dr. Carter G. Woodson, known as the “Father of Black…

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Anna Louise James behind the soda fountain in the James' pharmacy

Anna Louise James Makes History with Medicine

Anna Louise James was born on January 19, 1886, in…

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Suffragette Helena Hill Weed of Norwalk, serving a 3 day sentence in D.C. prison for picketing July 4, 1917

19th Amendment: The Fight Over Woman Suffrage in Connecticut

The 19th Amendment to the Constitution guarantees all women who…

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Hats and bonnets, ca. 1805

First Woman to Receive US Patent – Today in History: May 5

On May 5, 1809, Mrs. Mary Kies of South Killingly…

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Video – Augusta Lewis Troup Tribute Film

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to Augusta Lewis Troup, a pioneering labor leader, journalist, educator, and suffragist.

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Mariann Wolcott

Map: Connecticut Women in History (more to come…)

March 27, 2017 • Hide Featured Image, Women, Work

From forging Revolutionary War ammunition to running newspapers, patenting new…

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Video – Dotha Bushnell Hillyer Tribute Film

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to philanthropist Dotha Bushnell Hillyer, patron of a living memorial to her father, the Reverend Horace Bushnell.

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Video – Helen Keller Tribute Film

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to Easton resident Helen Keller, an inspirational champion for the disabled.

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An Artist and Her Books: Amelia Watson, 1856–1934

Thought not traditionally a book illustrator, Connecticut artist Amelia Watson’s works adorn some of the most elaborately designed and treasured volumes of the 19th and 20th century.

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Video – Florence Wald Tribute Film

YouTube – Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame The Connecticut Women’s…

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Video – Barbara McClintock Tribute Film

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to Hartford native Barbara McClintock, a famed geneticist and Nobel Prize winner.

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Video – Mary Townsend Seymour Tribute Film

Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to Hartford native Mary Townsend Seymour, a pioneering advocate for equal rights for African Americans and co-founder of Hartford’s chapter of the NAACP.

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Kimberly Mansion, Glastonbury

The Smith Sisters, Their Cows, and Women’s Rights in Glastonbury

By refusing to pay unfair taxes, these siblings became national symbols of discrimination suffered by women and of the struggle of the individual against government.

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Photograph of Hilda Crosby Standish

Hilda Crosby Standish, Early Proponent of Women’s Reproductive Health

A pioneer of sex education and family planning, this physician directed the state’s first birth control clinic in 1935.

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Video – Florence Griswold Tribute Film

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to Florence Griswold, an Old Lyme native who fostered the impressionist art movement in Connecticut.

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Martha A. Parsons House

A Pioneering Woman in Business: Martha Parsons of Enfield

Enfield’s Martha Parsons broke new ground in her pursuit of employment opportunities for women. Her family home now belongs to the Enfield Historical Society.

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Emma Hart Willard: Leader in Women’s Education

Berlin-born Emma Hart Willard used her passion for learning to create new educational opportunities for women and foster the growth of the co-ed system.

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Fredi Washington and her sister Isabel, 1930s

Remembering Fredi Washington: Actress, Activist, and Journalist

February 22, 2017 • Arts, Popular Culture, Women

This actress earned acclaim for her portrayal of an African American woman who chooses to pass as white in order to escape racial discrimination but, in real life, she embraced her heritage and worked to end inequality.

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Constance Baker Motley: A Warrior for Justice

New Haven lawyer Constance Baker Motley became famous for arguing some of the most important cases of the civil rights movement.

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History in a Heart

February 12, 2017 • Everyday Life, Hide Featured Image, Women

A set of old Valentine’s Day cards, kept safe in a cloth-covered scrapbook, provide a look back at the sometimes humorous art of expressing heartfelt sentiments.

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Governor Ella Grasso

The Education of Ella Grasso

The daughter of Italian immigrants becomes Connecticut’s first woman governor.

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An example of two different Kewpie dolls

The Kewpies Buy A House in Westport

The Kewpies originally appeared as a comic strip in the Christmas issue of the 1909 Ladies Home Journal.

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World War II scrap metal drive, Hartford, ca. 1941-1944

Women and Defense: World War II on the Connecticut Home Front

Women who stepped into civil defense positions managed and implemented programs that educated the public, promoted war bond sales, and aided emergency preparedness.

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Beatrice Fox Auerbach meets with the department heads of her store, G. Fox & Company

Beatrice Fox Auerbach: Retail Pioneer Led Iconic Family Department Store

Beatrice Fox Auerbach was pioneering retail executive who ran the G. Fox & Co. department store and numerous philanthropic benefiting people in Hartford and around the world.

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Taking on the State: Griswold v. Connecticut

In the 1960s, Hartford native Estelle Griswold challenged Connecticut’s restrictive birth control law. Her argument for the right to privacy made it all the way to the Supreme Court.

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Prudence Crandall

State Heroine Prudence Crandall

Prudence Crandall was born in 1803 in Hopkinton, Rhode Island,…

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Windsor’s “Murder Factory”

At the beginning of the 20th century, Amy Duggan Archer…

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Hill-Stead Museum

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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Video – Martha Parsons Tribute Film

The Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to Enfield native Martha Parsons, the first female business executive in Connecticut to earn her position based on merit.

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Josephine Bennett and daughters Frances and Katherine

Hartford’s City Mother, Josephine Bennett

The small plaque in the south corner of the State…

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Laboring in the Shade

Thousands of black Southern students, including a young Martin Luther King Jr., came north to work in Connecticut’s tobacco fields.

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Providing Bundles for Britain and News for America

Janet Huntington Brewster Murrow was a Middletown native who grew up to be one of America’s most trusted news correspondents, philanthropists, and the wife of Edward R. Murrow.

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Emily Holcombe presenting deeds of Gold Street to Mayor Miles B. Preston

Emily Holcombe Pioneered to Preserve Connecticut’s Colonial Past

Emily Seymour Goodwin Holcombe was an activist and preservationist who…

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Marietta Canty

Marietta Canty House

The Marietta Canty House in Hartford, Connecticut, is primarily significant…

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Detail from a glass plate negative showing the rear of one of the tenements that lined the Park River

Hartford’s Sex Trade: Prostitutes and Politics

March 23, 2015 • Hartford, Social Movements, Women, Work

Union organizer Rebecca Weiner was among the few who proposed to address the social and economic conditions that enabled the world’s oldest profession to thrive in the capital city during the 1800s.

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Katharine Houghton Hepburn

Katharine Houghton Hepburn, A Woman Before Her Time

March 18, 2015 • Hartford, Social Movements, Women

This Hartford suffragist and reformer fought for women’s rights in the first half of the 20th century.

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Tantaquidgeon Lodge, Montville

Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon and Mohegan Cultural Renewal

An Ivy league-educated anthropologist, Mohegan Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon not…

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Emily Pierson handing out leaflets in New York State Suffrage Campaign

A Feeling of Solidarity: Labor Unions and Suffragists Team Up

The voting booth and the shop floor were two important arenas in the fight for women’s equality.

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Almira Ambler, Civil War Nurse

A Voice for Veterans: A Civil War era ‘Whistle-Blower’ – Who Knew?

Her obituary stated that “Mrs. Ambler was always expected to say something” on behalf of those who had fought for the Union.

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Prudence Crandall Museum

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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The Wethersfield Academy

Wethersfield Academy Est. 1804

Connecticut is celebrated for its long-lasting commitment to education.  In…

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The Story Trail of Voices

Mohegan history and religion have been preserved by many different voices in many different families through Mohegan Oral Tradition. However, since before the American Revolution, four women in particular have passed on Mohegan stories.

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Women Protestors of the Day March for the Vote

Looking Back: How the Vote Was Won

Today it is the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center (The Kate) but it began as the Old Saybrook Musical and Dramatic Club.

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Pastoral Picture by Faith Trumbull

Faith Trumbull: The Artist Was a Young Girl

Her younger brother may be the better-known artist today, but it was her accomplished needlework pictures that inspired his youthful imagination.

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