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Historic Preservation


Panoramic view of Bushnell Park, Hartford

Land Purchase Becomes Bushnell Park – Today in History: January 5

On January 5, 1854, Hartford voters approved spending over $100,000…

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Gravestones, Old Burying Ground, Hartford

The Art of Burying the Dead: Exploring Connecticut’s Historic Cemeteries

From winged death’s heads to weeping willows, gravestone carvings in Connecticut’s historic cemeteries reflect changing attitudes toward mourning and memorialization.

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Residence and Library of Ithiel Town, New Haven

American Architect Ithiel Town Born – Today in History: October 3

On October 3, 1784, prominent American architect and engineer Ithiel…

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Florence Griswold’s Home: A Story of Perseverance and Community

The Florence Griswold House, once a private residence, also served as a finishing school for girls in the 19th century and the center of the Lyme Art Colony.

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Mohegan Sacred Sites: Moshup’s Rock

Every nation has a spirit. The Mohegan Spirit moves and breathes within the very rocks and trees of the Mohegan Homeland in Uncasville, Connecticut.

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Merritt Parkway, New York to Connecticut, 1941

Merritt Parkway Creates Scenic Gateway to New England

This Depression-era road improvement project sought to artfully balance the natural and built environments, and despite setbacks and scandal, achieved its aims.

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A 1908 reenactment of Thomas Hooker’s 1636 landing in Hartford

Colonial Revival Movement Sought Stability during Time of Change

Connecticut’s past provided refuge from pressures of modern life.

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Squires Tavern, Barkhamsted

Providing Rest for the Weary in Barkhamsted

Built in the late 18th century, Squire’s Tavern represents over…

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Captain Oliver Filley House, Bloomfield

Restoring a Unique Piece of Bloomfield History

The Oliver Filley House in Bloomfield, Connecticut, is a two-story…

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Oliver Wolcott Library

Modernism in Connecticut through Photographs

A creed as much as a style, Modernism rejected the forms of the past in favor of an architecture that reflected a new spirit of living.

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Aunt Polly and Its Preservation

Screen actor, director, and playwright William Gillette owned a houseboat he named Aunt Polly. He lived on the boat and entertained there while he awaited final construction of his Connecticut mansion in East Haddam.

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The Beckley Blast Furnace stack as it looks today

The Beckley Blast Furnace, East Canaan

The Beckley Blast Furnace, also known as East Canaan #2,…

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The House That Hoadley Built

The Wheeler-Beecher House, sometimes referred to as the Hoadley House,…

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Postcard of New London Bridge on Thames River, New London, Conn.

I-95 Reaches New London

The arrival of I-95 to New London brought tremendous change to the city’s infrastructure, as well as to its businesses and neighborhoods.

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J. Frederick Kelly: Constructing Connecticut’s Architectural History

J. Frederick Kelly was both a well-known architect and preservationist, as well as an architectural historian, whose works chronicled the intricacies found in many of Connecticut’s historical properties.

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Indian Hill Cemetery and the Vernacular of the Times

Indian Hill Cemetery’s founders promoted their property as a place to find peace, both with the natural environment and with the area’s indigenous past.

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A Baltic Mill Helps Found a New Town

The Baltic Mill was once the largest cotton mill in the United States and led to the founding of the town of Sprague.

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Delivery truck for The Lustron Home

Metal Homes for the Atomic Age

Once touted as the house “America has been waiting for,” only a few post-WWII Lustron steel houses remain in Connecticut.

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Detail from the bird's-eye map Bristol, Conn. Looking North-East, 1889

Joel T. Case and the Victorianization of Bristol’s Federal Hill

The Victorian designs of inventor and architect Joel T. Case make substantial contributions to the landscape of the Federal Hill area in Bristol.

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The Forlorn Soldier

The Forlorn Soldier, a statue by James G. Batterson, survived years of neglect, punishing weather, and movements to tear it down, and yet still serves an important purpose in Civil War commemoration.

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Torrington Recovers after the Flood of ‘55

In August of 1955, two hurricanes that moved through Connecticut…

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Faulkner’s Island

Improving Sea Transportation: Guilford Goes About it the Light Way

Approximately 3 ½ miles off the coast of Guilford lies…

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Mayor Lee (center) of New Haven, looking at Knights of Columbus building model

Richard Lee’s Urban Renewal in New Haven

Thanks largely to his efforts at Urban Renewal, New Haven’s Richard C. Lee became one of the most celebrated and well-known mayors of the 20th century.

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Map – Connecticut Landmarks of the Constitution

A map of some of the Connecticut Landmarks of the Constitution researched and published by the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation.

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Connecticut’s Capitol Building – Inside and Out

The Connecticut State Capitol was built at a time when Civil War commemoration was gaining popularity. Capturing elements of the Victorian Gothic and Second Empire styles, the building is a testament to the work of James Batterson, Richard Upjohn, and the era in which it was designed and fabricated.

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Comstock covered bridge

The Comstock Bridge Brings East Hampton Residents Together

Over the Salmon River in East Hampton rests the Comstock…

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Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial Arch, Hartford

The Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch, Hartford

Situated in Bushnell Park, the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch honors the more than 4,000 Hartford men who fought for the Union during the Civil War.

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Somoff Cottage

A Russian Village Retreat in Southbury

Located in the southwest corner of Southbury, nestled between Interstate…

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Video – Hidden History: Keney Tower

Your Town’s History in Video: Keney Tower

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Hill-Stead Museum

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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Interior West Cornwall Covered Bridge

West Cornwall Covered Bridge: An Icon of New England Craftsmanship

The community of West Cornwall is home to one of…

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Mary and Eliza Freeman Houses, Bridgeport, photograph ca. 1998

Mary and Eliza Freeman Houses

Houses owned by Mary and Eliza Freeman are the only remnants of “Little Liberia,” a settlement of free African Americans in Bridgeport, Connecticut, that began in 1831 and reached its highest population just prior to the outbreak of the Civil War.

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Indian Hill Cemetery and the Landscaping of Burial Grounds in the Mid-19th Century

The landscaping of Indian Hill Cemetery speaks to 19th-century reactions to industrialization and urbanization and the search for peaceful natural environments.

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Wesleyan Hills Helps Redefine Suburbia

The design of the Wesleyan Hills community in Middletown, Connecticut, stands in stark contrast to the uninspiring, cookie-cutter suburbs of the Post-World War II era.

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Wallace Nutting, The Shadow of the Blossoms

Past Perfect: Wallace Nutting Invents an Ideal Olde New England

In the early 1900s consumers bought photographs, furniture, and books from a former minister who skillfully sold the fantasy of simpler times as an antidote to modern life.

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Emily Holcombe presenting deeds of Gold Street to Mayor Miles B. Preston

Emily Holcombe Pioneered to Preserve Connecticut’s Colonial Past

Emily Seymour Goodwin Holcombe was an activist and preservationist who…

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Levi B. Frost House, Southington

The Frost House Once Offered Travelers a Warm Welcome

On Marion Avenue in the southwest corner of Southington sits…

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Preserving an All-American Downtown in Torrington

Torrington is a city aware of its architectural heritage. Its…

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The Bryan-Andrew House, Orange

The Bryan-Andrew House: Still Standing After All These Years

Believed to be the oldest house in Orange, the Bryan-Andrew…

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A Better Home and Garden in Bethlehem

The Bellamy-Ferriday House is a three-story, white clapboard house located…

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Thomas Darling House and Tavern, Woodbridge

The Darlings Make Preservation a Family Affair

Thomas Darling was an 18th-century merchant, farmer, and politician and…

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David Hotchkiss House, ca. 1980

The Prospect Green as a Historical Narrative

In the southeast corner of the intersection of Routes 68…

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Marietta Canty

Marietta Canty House

The Marietta Canty House in Hartford, Connecticut, is primarily significant…

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Tantaquidgeon Lodge, Montville

Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon and Mohegan Cultural Renewal

An Ivy league-educated anthropologist, Mohegan Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon not…

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Detail of Sam Colt Memorial

The Colt Memorial, Cedar Hill Cemetery

Commissioned by Samuel Colt’s wife, Elizabeth Jarvis Colt, and designed…

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Standing at Rest, at Last: The Story of the Forlorn Soldier

Started with an inquiry, then researched and written, and finally…

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Pomp and Circumstance: Civil War Commemoration

The completion of the Forlorn Soldier did not meet with the pomp and circumstance of many other CIvil War commemorations, despite its media coverage and an overflowing sense of nationalism among the general public.

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Walnut Grove, Hammond Estate, Waterford

“Gentleman’s Farming” Comes to Waterford

Walnut Grove is the former estate of the Hammond family,…

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English barn, Ashford

Barn Design in Connecticut

Most barns still on the Northeast landscape are New England-style barns from the 19th century and later.

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Laurel Street bridge construction, Hartford

From Frontier Town to Capital City: Collection Traces Hartford’s Transformation

How does a colonial town become a modern city? A unique collection, with documents dating to the 1630s, helps provide answers.

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Infrared view of Philip Johnson's Glass House and Pavillion, New Canaan

Philip Johnson in His Own Words

In 1985, this famed architect offered a candid take on his life and work, with the stipulation that it not be made public until after his death.

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Aldrich Free Public Library, Plainfield

Aldrich Free Public Library: Dedicated to the Dissemination of Knowledge

Over 100 years ago, residents of the Moosup section of…

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Dedication of the New State Capitol, 1876

New State Capitol 1878

By the 1870s, the State’s practice of having dual capitols…

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Ashbel Woodward house, Franklin

Franklin’s Ashbel Woodward was a Battlefield Surgeon and Historian

Ashbel Woodward was a physician, historian, and farmer who spent…

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View in Batterson, Canfield & Co.'s Monumental Works

James G. Batterson, Stone Contractor

James G. Batterson, a native of Windsor, was an artist, inventor, and businessman. He supported both Governor Buckingham and President Lincoln during the Civil War, and afterward, helped commemorate the war through his proficiency with stone.

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Detail of the Town Hall, Public Library, and Fire Department and the Bristol Manufacturing Company

The Plainville Town Hall Catches Fire

Built in 1890, the three-story Plainville Town Hall quickly became…

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American Mills Web Shop, West Haven

Elastic Web Expands Textile Manufacturing in West Haven

For the better part of a century, West Haven produced…

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Historic photo of the Ebenezer Avery House, Groton

The Ebenezer Avery House – Who Knew?

…that the Ebenezer Avery House on the grounds of Fort…

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The Story Trail of Voices

Mohegan history and religion have been preserved by many different voices in many different families through Mohegan Oral Tradition. However, since before the American Revolution, four women in particular have passed on Mohegan stories.

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Warren Congregational Church

Warren Congregational Church, a Longstanding Community Center

Located at 4 Sackett Hill Road in Warren, Connecticut, is…

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Phelps-Hatheway House and Garden

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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Makris Diner, 1795 Berlin Turnpike, Wethersfield

A Hip Road Trip

Known as “Gasoline Alley” during the 1950s, the Berlin Turnpike boasts a heady visual mix of neon, brand names, logos, and 1960s’ motel Modernism.

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Bush-Holley House

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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Detail of Beacon Falls Mill, Beacon Falls

Weaving the Cultural Fabric of Beacon Falls

The textile mills of the Naugatuck Valley brought tremendous change…

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Jens Risom and a selection of his furniture

The Answer Is Risom!

How the Scandinavian design movement re-fashioned local industry in the mill town of Thompson during the 1960s and ’70s.

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Railroad tracks, Bolton Hill Cut, Bolton

Rock-Solid Industry in 19th-Century Bolton

Driving along Route 44 in Bolton, motorists travel through a…

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New Haven Green

The Connecticut Town Green

Considered a quintessential feature of the New England landscape, town greens weren’t always the peaceful, park-like spaces we treasure today.

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Public library, Southington

A History of Libraries Speaks Volumes About Southington

While it is not uncommon in the modern era for…

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Holmes Block, Wyassup Road and village center

Stepping Back in Time: North Stonington Village Historic District

Lying in an area of New London County just eight…

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Samuel Huntington

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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Waste Not, Want Not: The Colonial Era Midden

From tools, dishes, and clothing to muskrat bones, household trash from 1700s reveals how Yankees of the era lived.

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Video – Hidden History: Connecticut Historical Society

Your Town’s History in Video: Connecticut Historical Society

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