News & Updates

The Deutschland at the Connecticut State Pier in New London

New London Harbors a German Submarine During World War I – Who Knew?

The German merchant submarine Deutschland made two trips to America, including one to New London, Connecticut, during World War I.

Read

Detail of Map exhibiting the route of the Norwich & Worcester Railroad

Iron and Water: The Norwich & Worcester Railroad Story

November 16, 2019 • Norwich, Transportation

Connecticut’s early railroad history had at its core the goal of linking New York City and Boston through a hybrid system of steamboats and trains.

Read

Paul Robeson by Gordon Parks, 1942

“Negroes Who Stand Up and Fight Back” – Paul Robeson in Hartford

November 15, 2019 • Arts, Enfield, Hartford, Social Movements, Work

Called the “greatest mobilization of police in the city’s history,” the event that brought law enforcement out in force to Keney Park was not a riot, not a strike, but a concert by this singer-actor and activist.

Read

Meriden Britannia Company, West Main Street, Meriden

Meriden’s Silver Lining

Like many towns in central Connecticut that found sustaining an…

Read

Little Sorrel

Little Sorrel, Connecticut’s Confederate War Horse

A foal born on a farm owned by Noah C….

Read

Honor and Duty: The Life of Alfred Howe Terry

Born in New Haven, Alfred Howe Terry studied law before heroically capturing Fort Fisher during the Civil War. He earned the thanks of Congress for this victory before maintaining peace between whites and Native Americans in the Dakotas.

Read

The Connecticut Poll Tax

November 9, 2019 • Law, Politics and Government, The State

The Connecticut poll tax lasted for almost 300 years and encompassed four different variants.

Read

Scandal in the Beecher Family

An alleged affair between Elizabeth Tilton and Henry Ward Beecher became public in 1872 and inspired a series of lawsuits for libel. The incident involved one of the state’s most respected citizens and religious leaders and attracted national attention.

Read

Native American Musical Instrument - Connecticut Historical Society

Connecticut Native American Arts

October 27, 2019 • Arts, Native Americans, Montville

The remarkable resilience of Connecticut’s native cultures can be seen in the tribes’ social networks, political governance, commitment to educating others about native history, and their ongoing work to sustain their traditions.

Read

Corporal Thomas Fox , Second Connecticut Volunteer Heavy Artillery, B Company with his regimental flag

Disaster at Cold Harbor: Connecticut’s Second Volunteer Heavy Artillery Regiment

October 26, 2019 • Derby, Civil War

For many veterans of the Second, the assault at Cold Harbor would be the most terrible memory of their Civil War careers.

Read

Clarence Dickinson Carries Printing Innovation into the 20th Century

October 25, 2019 • Invention and Technology, Haddam, Work

Clarence Dickinson was a long-time Haddam resident and pioneer in…

Read

Gerald Chapman: America’s First “Public Enemy Number One”

October 12, 2019 • Crime and Punishment, New Britain

On October 12, 1924, in New Britain, Connecticut, Gerald Chapman…

Read

General Joseph R. Hawley

General Joseph R. Hawley Helps Commemorate Connecticut’s Civil War Soldiers

“Let monuments be raised in every town, let songs be sung and orations delivered,” urged this state politician and skilled speechmaker.

Read

A Different “Type” of Connecticut Industry

In the middle of the 1800s, the invention of the…

Read

Sandbags in Rockville. September 22, 1938

Hurricane of 1938: Connecticut’s Worst Disaster

Deadly as well as costly, this storm scarred the landscape for decades after and left each Connecticut family with its own tale to tell of the ruinous events.

Read

Amos Doolittle, The looking glass for 1787. A house divided against itself cannot stand

The Connecticut Ratification Convention

Though approved at a renegade convention on September 17, 1787, the US Constitution did not become “the supreme law of the land” until 9 of the 13 states ratified the document.

Read

Igor Sikorsky and the first successful helicopter built in America, Stratford

Igor Sikorsky and his Flying Machines

This Russian émigré not only invented a machine capable of controlled vertical flight, he also re-invented his aviation career along the way.

Read

Benedict Arnold

Benedict Arnold Turns and Burns New London

September 6, 1781 was a brutal and terrifying day for Connecticut citizens living on both sides of New London harbor, along the Thames River.

Read

David Bushnell and his Revolutionary Submarine

How a farmer’s son became the Father of Submarine Warfare during the American Revolution.

Read

Training and rescue submarine S-4 submerging

Video – Undersea University – US Navy’s Submarine School

Produced by the US Government in 1965, this film of…

Read

Envelope of the Briggs Manufacturing Company

Briggs Manufacturing Drives Voluntown’s 19th-Century Cotton Economy

The Briggs Manufacturing Company was the premier employer in Voluntown,…

Read

Fitch’s Home for Soldiers, ca. 1864

Fitch Soldiers’ Home Closes – Today in History: August 28

August 28, 2019 • Darien, Rocky Hill, War and Defense

On August 28, 1940, Fitch’s Home for Soldiers and their…

Read

Postcard of Dinosaur State Park, ca. 1960s

Discovered Dinosaur Tracks Re-Route Highway and Lead to State Park

Some 200 million years ago, carnivorous dinosaurs roamed Rocky Hill leaving the three-toed tracks that would become our state fossil.

Read

Tobacco barns in Windsor, Connecticut

Windsor Tobacco: Made in the Shade

Early New England settlers found the Windsor area’s sandy loam…

Read

Charles De Wolf Brownell, Charter Oak

The Legend of the Charter Oak

This Charles D. Brownell painting from the mid-1850s epitomizes the…

Read

Shaker advertisement to board horses, 1884

Enfield’s Shaker Legacy

Shaking Quakers settled in Enfield and created the packaged seed business.

Read

A Metal Giant in Wilton

August 20, 2019 • Arts, Business and Industry, Wilton, Work

By Gregg Mangan Kenneth Lynch was an accomplished blacksmith who…

Read

Women Suffrage March

Women Win the Right to Vote

August 18, 2019 • Social Movements, Women

After a decades-long struggle, women in Connecticut and across the US gained a say in government.

Read

Putting History on the Map

While maps serve a utilitarian function at the time of their production, years later they become snapshots in time as displays of the personal and collective memories of those who designed them. Such is the case with maps drawn by James Wadsworth and Douglas Grant Mitchell.

Read

U.S. Frigate Constitution, Isaac Hull, Esqr., commander

Fame and Infamy for the Hulls of Derby

Two Connecticut men, uncle and nephew, had starring roles—one in defeat and one in victory—during the War of 1812.

Read

Florence Griswold’s Home: A Story of Perseverance and Community

The Florence Griswold House, once a private residence, also served as a finishing school for girls in the 19th century and the center of the Lyme Art Colony.

Read

State Representative William A. O'Neill and State Senator David M. Barry

William O’Neill: Climbing Up the Political Ladder

Connecticut’s 84th governor, William Atchison O’Neill, was born in Hartford on…

Read

North Stonington Grange, North Stonington Village Historic Distric

North Stonington Fairs Preserve Connecticut’s Agricultural Heritage

Despite brief success as a mill town in the early…

Read

Westford Glass Company factory, Ashford

Ashford’s Glass from the Past

In 1857, 13 stockholders invested $18,000 to form the Westford…

Read

Thomas Cole, View of Monte Video, Seat of Daniel Wadsworth Esq., 1878

Talcott Mountain: A View of Early New England

August 2, 2019 • Avon, Environment, Everyday Life

The Talcott Mountain range lies in the northeastern section of…

Read

Hardcore Connecticut: Documenting the State’s Punk Rock Scene

Hardcore punk rockers occupied venue spaces, spectators became performers, pools became skate parks, and Xerox machines became the printing press in this underground renaissance.

Read

Civil War Monument, Kensington

Kensington Soldiers Monument Dedicated – Today in History: July 28

July 28, 2019 • Berlin, Civil War

On July 28, 1863, the Soldiers Monument in the Kensington…

Read

Samuel Colt…and Sewing Machines?

The National Museum of American History explains how a revolver, sewing machine, bicycle, and early-model electric automobile are connected.

Read

Detail of Warwick patent copy by John Winthrop, Jr., 1662

The Charter of 1662

The Connecticut Charter, which provided the basis for Connecticut government…

Read

Oliver Ellsworth

Senator Oliver Ellsworth’s Judiciary Act

When the United States Senate first convened in 1789, many…

Read

Up from the Ashes: Fire at the Meriden Britannia Company – Today in History: July 16

A manufacturer of silver-plated ware rebounds from the worst fire ever to occur in Meriden.

Read

Connecticut State Park Picture Plan

Preserving Connecticut’s Natural Beauty: Connecticut’s First State Parks

Sherwood Island, Mount Tom, Macedonia Brook, and Kent Falls are among the earliest lands set aside for public enjoyment as the parks movement took hold in the state.

Read

The Hartford Circus Fire

Thursday July 6, 1944, was a miserably hot day in…

Read

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

Charlotte Perkins Gilman Born – Today in History: July 3

On July 3, 1860, Charlotte Anna Perkins (Charlotte Perkins Gilman)…

Read

1938 ad for Sperry Topsider

Boat Shoes Have Ties to Connecticut – Who Knew?

…that during a cold Connecticut winter in 1935 Paul Sperry…

Read

Noble Jerome’s Clock Patent Model

Noble Jerome submitted this clock patent model to the US Patent Office along with his patent application in 1839. Providing a working model to the Patent Office was a common requirement for inventors up until the 1880s.

Read

General Mansfield's uniform epaulets

One of the Honored Dead: General J. K. F. Mansfield

A resident of New Haven and Middletown, Joseph Mansfield rose to the rank of brigadier general in the Union army before losing his life at the Battle of Antietam.

Read

View of the Colt Factory from Dutch Point

The Colt Patent Fire-Arms Manufacturing Company

Samuel Colt, the man who revolutionized firearms manufacturing in the…

Read

Mark Twain House & Museum, Hartford

Where Mr. Twain and Mrs. Stowe Built Their Dream Houses

This bucolic oasis on Hartford’s western edge became home to great literary talents, social reformers, politicians, and other nationally-regarded luminaries of the mid-to-late 1800s.

Read

Sarah Bernhardt

Sarah Bernhardt Performs in Hartford – Today in History: June 8

June 8, 2019 • Arts, Hartford

On June 8, 1906, French stage and film actress Sarah…

Read

More Articles

 

Sign Up For Email Updates

Oops! We could not locate your form.