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Native Americans


Blacksmith Isaac Glasko Challenges the State Constitution

Isaac Glasko was a blacksmith of mixed African American and Native American descent who challenged 19th-century voting rights in Connecticut.

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Quinnipiac: The People of the Long Water Land

The Quinnipiac still live in Connecticut and across the country, but the community is not presently one of Connecticut’s recognized tribes, nor is it federally acknowledged.

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Chief G’tinemong/Ralph W. Sturges

This Mohegan Chief is remembered for successfully guiding the Tribe through the final stages of Federal Recognition, which it obtained in 1994.

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Indian Hill Cemetery and the Vernacular of the Times

Indian Hill Cemetery’s founders promoted their property as a place to find peace, both with the natural environment and with the area’s indigenous past.

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Rediscovering Albert Afraid-of-Hawk

Albert Afraid-of-Hawk was born Cetan Kokipa on the Great Sioux…

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The figure of the Indians' fort or palizado in New England and the manner of the destroying it by Captayne Underhill and Captayne Mason

Connecticut Declares War Against the Pequot – Today in History: May 1

On May 1, 1637, Connecticut Colony declared war against the…

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Frame for Indian round house

Living Rituals: Mohegan Wigwam Festival

The Wigwam festival is a modern version of the ancient Mohegan Thanksgiving for the Corn Harvest, or Green Corn Festival.

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Chief G’tinemong/Ralph W. Sturges

This Mohegan Chief is remembered for successfully guiding the Tribe through the final stages of Federal Recognition, which it obtained in 1994.

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Detail from the Articles of agreement between the English in Connecticutt and the Indian Sachems

Slavery and the Pequot War

For some, the existence of slavery in New England is…

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Pachaug Trail, Wiclcabouet Marsh, Voluntown

The Story of Connecticut’s Largest State Forest

Pachaug State Forest is the largest state forest in Connecticut….

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Detail from A mapp of New England by John Seller

Lion Gardiner Helps to Fortify Early Old Saybrook

In 1635, the governor of the Saybrook colony hired engineer…

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Attack on the Narragansett fort

America’s Most Devastating Conflict: King Philip’s War

The ramifications of this bloody conflict echoed across the centuries.

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Mohegan Sacred Sites: Moshup’s Rock

Every nation has a spirit. The Mohegan Spirit moves and breathes within the very rocks and trees of the Mohegan Homeland in Uncasville, Connecticut.

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Tantaquidgeon Lodge, Montville

Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon and Mohegan Cultural Renewal

An Ivy league-educated anthropologist, Mohegan Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon not…

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The Surprising Prevalence of Earthquake Activity in Connecticut

Connecticut has experienced thousands of earthquakes since European settled the area. The most active site for seismic activity is the village of Moodus in East Haddam.

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Connecticut in the French and Indian War

Connecticut troops sustained demoralizing losses before a reinvigorated British military turned the tide of the French and Indian War.

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Twenty-three-year old Virginia Algonquian man

Algonquin Man 1645

The Native American presence in Connecticut represents an important part…

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The house of Samson Occom in Mohegan, Montville

Samson Occom and the Brotherton Indians

A Mohegan and founding member of a pantribal group of Christian Indians, Occum sought to preserve Native autonomy by living apart from European communities.

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Sleeping Giant, Mount Carmel, Hamden

A Volcanic Giant Sleeps in Hamden

The town of Hamden lies between two trap rock formations…

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American Whaler printed by Elijah Chapman Kellogg

New London’s Indian Mariners

November 23, 2013 • Law, Native Americans, New London, Work

In an era of dispossession and diminishing autonomy on land, Native American mariners learned to use Anglo-American structures and institutions to establish a degree of power and personal freedom for themselves.

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Barkhamsted, Lighthouse Archaeological Site

“Outcasts” Build Their Own Village in 18th-Century Barkhamsted

September 26, 2013 • Barkhamsted, Everyday Life, Native Americans

In a wooded area of Barkhamsted near Ragged Mountain lie…

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The Story Trail of Voices

Mohegan history and religion have been preserved by many different voices in many different families through Mohegan Oral Tradition. However, since before the American Revolution, four women in particular have passed on Mohegan stories.

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Mohegan Federal Recognition

“We are no longer the little old tribe that lives upon the hill. We are now the Nation that lives upon the hill.”

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources

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Lantern Hill

Breaking the Myth of the Unmanaged Landscape

Evidence of early Native land use is etched into the landscape and preserved in oral tradition as well as the historical and archaeological records. This is in direct contradiction to a persistent myth of colonialism: that European settlers encountered a virgin landscape free of human intervention and ripe for development.

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Pequot bowl, trade item, 17th century

Causes of the Pequot War

The outbreak of the Pequot War (1636-37) is best understood…

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Map of Connecticut showing the settlements in 1670

Connecticut’s Oldest English Settlement

In 1633, Windsor became Connecticut’s first English settlement. This was…

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