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When the NFL Played in Connecticut: The Hartford Blues

In 1926, the Hartford Blues became the first and only NFL team to call Connecticut home. After a disappointing season, the NFL voted them out of the league.

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Joel Barlow

The Hartford Wits

Eventually taking the name the “Hartford Wits,” some of the most influential figures of the 18th century got together to write poetry that documented the state of the times.

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Jimmy Piersall’s Public Struggle with Mental Illness

Professional baseball great Jimmy Piersall battled with mental illness all of his life.

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Elizabeth W. Coe Demands the Right of Jury Service

After passage of the 19th Amendment, Elizabeth W. Coe of Waterbury argued that women should be granted the right to serve on jury panels.

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Waterbury’s Radium Girls

In the early 20th century, girls working at the Waterbury Clock Company faced death and disease from exposure to radium in the workplace.

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February 2, 1902, a fire broke out at Reid & Hughes dry goods store in Waterbury

Six Cities Respond to 1902 Waterbury Fire – Who Knew?

…that the fire, which swept through Waterbury on a stormy…

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Original waterwheels, Waterbury Brass Company

Birth of the Brass Valley

January 25, 2020 • Business and Industry, Waterbury

The brass industry in Waterbury began in the mid-18th century…

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Ingersoll Mickey Mouse Wrist Watch, 1933

Waterbury Clock Company Saved by Mickey Mouse – Who Knew?

…that the Ingersoll Waterbury Company (now Timex) was saved from…

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Waterbury’s Holy Land

December 18, 2019 • Belief, Popular Culture, Waterbury

Holy Land USA is a Waterbury theme park celebrating the…

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The American Brass Company: Leading the Way in the “Brass Valley”

The American Brass Company helped make Connecticut’s Naugatuck Valley a center of international brass production, but economic decline and foreign competition ended its run in the late 20th century.

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Hopkins Street Center once known as the Pearl St. Neighborhood House

A Woman Who Developed Tolerance: Leila T. Alexander

November 18, 2019 • War and Defense, Waterbury, Women, World War II

On Saturday, November 18, 1944, at noon after the meeting…

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The “Red Scare” in Connecticut

The Palmer Raids, launched in Connecticut in 1919, were part of the paranoia known as the “Red Scare” that resulted in numerous civil rights violations committed by law enforcement officials.

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Benjamin Spock: Raising the World’s Children

Pediatrician (and Connecticut native) Benjamin Spock revolutionized childcare in the 20th century before becoming a leading figure in the anti-war movement of the 60s and 70s.

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The Rise of the Black Panther Party in Connecticut

As they did nationally, the Black Panther Party in Connecticut fought for an end to discriminatory legal and regulatory practices, often clashing with authorities to achieve their goals.

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Connecticut’s Loyal Subjects: Toryism and the American Revolution

Loyalists in Connecticut, often acting on beliefs tied to relegion, proved particularly prominent in Fairfield County. Many of them fled to Canada rather than face imprisonment at New-Gate.

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The House That Hoadley Built

The Wheeler-Beecher House, sometimes referred to as the Hoadley House,…

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African American baseball team, Danbury

Swinging for the Fences: Connecticut’s Black Baseball Greats

In Connecticut, African Americans played organized baseball as early as 1868. In the years that followed, some of the game’s biggest stars played for teams throughout the state.

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Video – Rosalind Russell Tribute Film

Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame pays tribute to Waterbury native Rosalind Russell, the legendary award-winning actress of stage and screen.

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Can Opener, E. J. Warner, patented January 5, 1858

The First US Can Opener – Today in History: January 5

On January 5, 1858, Waterbury native Ezra J. Warner invented…

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Can Opener, E. J. Warner, patented January 5, 1858

The First US Can Opener – Today in History: January 5

On January 5, 1858, Waterbury native Ezra J. Warner invented…

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Waterbury Tornado – Today in History: May 24

On May 24, 1962, a tornado hit the towns of…

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Searching for the Common Good, 1888-1905

Stimulated by immigration and industrialization, Connecticut cities expanded rapidly

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Excelsior Cutlery

Connecticut Pocketknife Firms

Connecticut pocketknife production began around 1840. Over the next two decades, Connecticut became the earliest state to have a burgeoning craft.

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Ruins of commercial buildings on Grand Street, Waterbury

Waterbury Burns – Today in History: February 2

February 2, 2018 • Disaster, Waterbury

High Winds Whipped Waterbury Fire On the evening of February…

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Connecticut Pin Makers

For the latter half of the 19th century and for much of the 20th, Connecticut led the nation in pin production.

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Capitol, Hartford, Connecticut

The State Cantata – Today in History: June 3

On June 3, 2003, the Connecticut General Assembly designated The…

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Selma, Not So Far Away

Father Leonard Tartaglia was sometimes called Hartford’s “Hoodlum Priest.” Like the 1961 film of the same name, Tartaglia ministered to the city’s poor and disenfranchised.

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Over Time: Waterbury’s Historical Population

March 27, 2014 • Hide Featured Image, Waterbury

Census data, from colonial times on up to the present, is a key resource for those who study the ways in which communities change with the passage of time.

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A page from a clock design booklet by Daniel Burnap

When the World Ran on Connecticut Time

The success of the clock- and watch-making industries in Connecticut…

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Naugatuck Railroad Station

Henry Bacon Helps Beautify Naugatuck

Best known for the Lincoln Memorial, this architect also designed a railroad station, WWI monument, and a bridge for Naugatuck.

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Mattatuck Museum

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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