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Remembering Civil War Prisoners of War

Outside the Connecticut State Capitol building in Hartford stands a monument to the Connecticut prisoners retained at the Andersonville Prison during the Civil War.

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Uncas Monument

Buffalo Bill Cody Visits the Monument of Uncas – Today in History: July 2

July 2, 2021 • Norwich, Popular Culture

On July 2, 1907, American adventurer and showman “Buffalo Bill”…

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Gun Wheel of the First Light Battery, Connecticut Volunteers

The First Light Battery Connecticut Volunteers took part in numerous battles during the Civil War. A wheel damaged in battle now resides at the Connecticut State Capitol to commemorate the service of this unit.

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“Appalling Calamity”: Loss of the Steamboat Lexington – Today in History: January 13, 1840

On January 13, 1840, over 150 people perished on Long Island Sound when the steamboat Lexington caught fire. Only four survived the “Appalling Calamity,” as newspapers across the country described it.

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Map of the West Indies, 1717

Connecticut and the West Indies: Sugar Spurs Trans-Atlantic Trade

This profitable exchange brought wealth and sought-after goods to the state but came at the price of supporting slavery in the bargain.

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Ellis Ruley: Art that Celebrated Life

January 5, 2021 • Arts, Norwich, Slavery and Abolition

Ellis Ruley, the son of a slave who escaped to Norwich, rose to prominence as an artist, but prosperity and racial tensions created resentment among members of the local population.

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USS Confederacy (by William Nowland Van Powel

USS Confederacy: The Life and Service of Connecticut’s Continental Frigate

Nearly 20 years before the launching of the USS Constitution, a modest shipyard in Norwich, CT launched the Confederacy.

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Leffingwell Inn, Norwichtown

Christopher Leffingwell Born – Today in History: June 11

On June 11, 1734, businessman and civic leader Christopher Leffingwell…

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Edwin Land Inventor of the Polaroid Born – Today in History: May 7

On May 7, 1909, Edwin Herbert Land, founder of the…

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Playing with Time: The Introduction of Daylight Saving Time in Connecticut

Despite both formal and informal attempts to regulate the observance of Daylight Savings Time in Connecticut, it still remains a controversial topic for many state residents.

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Detail of Map exhibiting the route of the Norwich & Worcester Railroad

Iron and Water: The Norwich & Worcester Railroad Story

November 16, 2019 • Norwich, Transportation

Connecticut’s early railroad history had at its core the goal of linking New York City and Boston through a hybrid system of steamboats and trains.

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Norwich City Hall, Union Square, Norwich, New London County

Site Lines: Monuments to Connecticut’s Lost County Government

County government operated in Connecticut in one form or another for nearly 300 years before the state abolished it in 1960.

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Benedict Arnold house, New Haven

Benedict Arnold died in London, England – Today in History: June 14

June 14, 2018 • Benedict Arnold, New Haven, Norwich

On June 14, 1801, Revolutionary War general and traitor Benedict…

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Significant Events & Developments, 1866-1887

After the Civil War, arms manufacturing kept Connecticut industries busy, but an economic depression in the 1870s drastically changed things.

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Benedict Arnold: America’s Most Famous Traitor

Benedict Arnold of Norwich was one of the great Continental army heroes of the American Revolution before committing treason and joining the British army.

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James Lindsey Smith Takes the Underground Railroad to Connecticut

James Lindsey Smith was one of many slaves who found freedom through the Underground Railroad network that included many stops in Connecticut, including New Haven, Hartford, and Norwich.

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Norwich Arms barrel room

Norwich’s “Volcanic” Past

With its year-round availability of water power, its location at…

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Railroad bridge, Norwich, ca. 1870

Combined Rail-and-Water System Makes Norwich a Key Travel Hub in Mid-1800s

October 8, 2014 • Norwich, Transportation

For waterfront towns like Norwich (located on the Thames River),…

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Over Time: Norwich’s Historical Population

June 29, 2014 • Hide Featured Image, Norwich

Census data, from colonial times on up to the present, is a key resource for those who study the ways in which communities change with the passage of time.

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Pottery at Norwich, Norwich, ca. 1830.

From Kiln to Collection: Norwich Pottery and Its Makers

January 26, 2014 • Everyday Life, Norwich

Despite the lack of good local clay, Norwich potteries flourished, turning out jugs, jars, crocks, pie plates, dishes, and other utilitarian objects.

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View of Norwich, from the west side of the river

Norwich in Perspective

May 24, 2013 • Environment, Everyday Life, Norwich

Two different artistic takes on a prosperous 19th-century mill town and commercial center.

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Samuel Huntington

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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Clock works by Daniel Burnap

Marking Time: Early Connecticut Innovations Transform Clock Making

During the 18th and 19th centuries, Connecticut played a major role in transforming clock making from a time-intensive handcraft into a mass-production industry.

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: Slater Memorial Museum

January 14, 2013 • Hide Featured Image, Arts, Norwich

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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Eleanor: The Maltese Port painting by Vincenzo D'Esposito

The Slaters Go Round the World

In 1894, a well-to-do Norwich family set sail from New London on a ship outfitted with Persian rugs, oil paintings, a library with hundreds of titles, and 75 cases of champagne.

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