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Oakwood Acres temporary housing

The Debate Over Who Could Occupy World War II Public Housing in West Hartford

In the 1940s, African American war workers eligible for government-funded housing found access restricted to some properties despite vacancies.

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Elihu Burritt

Elihu Burritt Born – Today in History: December 8

On December 8, 1810, Elihu Burritt was born in New…

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The “Red Scare” in Connecticut

The Palmer Raids, launched in Connecticut in 1919, were part of the paranoia known as the “Red Scare” that resulted in numerous civil rights violations committed by law enforcement officials.

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Gerald Chapman: America’s First “Public Enemy Number One”

October 12, 2019 • Crime and Punishment, New Britain

On October 12, 1924, in New Britain, Connecticut, Gerald Chapman…

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The 1909 seven passenger limousine

The Hardware City Could’ve Been the Motor City – Who Knew?

…that New Britain could add automobile manufacturing to its long…

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Witamy to Little Poland! – A Thriving Neighborhood in New Britain

April 13, 2019 • Immigration, New Britain

A bustling ethnic neighborhood along Broad Street in New Britain is home to such a vibrant Polish population that it earned the nickname “Little Poland.”

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Governor Ribicoff

Abraham Ribicoff: Kennedy Confidant and Connecticut’s First Jewish Governor

Abraham Ribicoff rose from a New Britain tenement to become Connecticut’s first Jewish governor and a confidant of President John F. Kennedy.

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African American baseball team, Danbury

Swinging for the Fences: Connecticut’s Black Baseball Greats

In Connecticut, African Americans played organized baseball as early as 1868. In the years that followed, some of the game’s biggest stars played for teams throughout the state.

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Joseph Taborsky and the “Mad Dog Killings”

Joseph “Mad Dog” Taborsky earned his nickname for the brutal…

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Governor Ribicoff

Abraham Ribicoff dies – Today in History: February 22

On February 22, 1998, Abraham Ribicoff died. An American Democratic…

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President Richard Nixon visits Hartford

The 42-Day Income Tax

In 1971, to eliminate the state’s budget deficit, Connecticut legislators approved a tax on income. Just forty-two days later, they repealed it, instead voting to increase the state’s sales tax.

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Charles K. Hamilton

Hamilton Breaks Air Records – Today in History: June 13

On June 13, 1910, Charles Keeney Hamilton of New Britain…

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Hamilton Wrecks Aeroplane – Today in History: April 22

On April 22, 1911, aviation pioneer Charles Hamilton crashed his…

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The “Father of American Football” is Born – Today in History: April 7

A native of New Britain, Walter Camp helped revolutionize the game of American football while a student and coach at Yale and for several years afterward.

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Elihu Burritt

Elihu Burritt Dies – Today in History: March 6

On March 6, 1879, Elihu Burritt “the learned blacksmith” died…

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Martha A. Parsons House

A Pioneering Woman in Business: Martha Parsons of Enfield

Enfield’s Martha Parsons broke new ground in her pursuit of employment opportunities for women. Her family home now belongs to the Enfield Historical Society.

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Governor Ribicoff

Abraham Ribicoff dies – Today in History: February 22

On February 22, 1998, Abraham Ribicoff died. An American Democratic…

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Apostle of Peace: Elihu Burritt’s Quest for Universal Brotherhood

Elihu Burritt, a blacksmith by trade, became an advocate for peace around the world throughout the 19th century.

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Illumination of Old State House, Hartford, December 31, 1900

A Turn-of-the-Century New Year’s Eve

December 31, 2016 • Everyday Life, Hartford, New Britain, Windham

Hailed as the “Century Celebration,” the evening of December 31,…

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Selma, Not So Far Away

Father Leonard Tartaglia was sometimes called Hartford’s “Hoodlum Priest.” Like the 1961 film of the same name, Tartaglia ministered to the city’s poor and disenfranchised.

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Underground Railroad Agents in Connecticut

New Britain Plays Part in the Underground Railroad

February 5, 2015 • New Britain, Slavery and Abolition

The Underground Railroad, developed in the early 19th century, was…

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Products from New Britain’s Past

In the early 20th century, New Britain produced a variety of housewares popular with the American public, including cutlery, toasters, waffle irons, pocketknives, food choppers, and eggbeaters.

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Peddler E.H. Farrell with his cart, 1910

New Britain’s Yankee Peddlers Boost 18th-century Economy

Around the year 1740, brothers William and Edward Patterson (or…

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Stanley Works for New Britain

In 1843, Frederick Stanley founded a small shop in New…

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P. & F. Corbin hardware shipping crate

The Corbin Cabinet Lock Company and Patent Law: A Lesson in Novelty from a CT Perspective

New Britain, fondly known as the “Hardware City,” had numerous…

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Over Time: New Britain’s Historical Population

January 11, 2014 • Hide Featured Image, New Britain

Census data, from colonial times on up to the present, is a key resource for those who study the ways in which communities change with the passage of time.

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Philip Corbin

Philip Corbin: Manufacturing A Legacy for New Britain

Born on October 26, 1824, in Willington, Connecticut, Philip Corbin…

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Video – Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures: New Britian Museum of American Art

November 19, 2012 • Arts, Hide Featured Image, New Britain

Connecticut’s Cultural Treasures is a series of 50 five-minute film vignettes that profiles a variety of the state’s most notable cultural resources.

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