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Pulling Down the Statue of King George II, New York City

Mariann Wolcott and Ralph Earl – Opposites Come Together and Make History

The story of Mariann Wolcott and Ralph Earl captures much of the complexity the Revolutionary War brought to the lives and interactions of ordinary citizens.

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Bigelow Tea–A Connecticut Tea Party

The Bigelow Tea Company was started as a small family business in Manhatten before moving to Norwalk and then Fairfield.

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Connecticut Attorney General John H. Light and His Fight for Woman’s Suffrage

Attorney General John H. Light made his pro-suffrage stance public at a time when such advocacy could still lead to criticism

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Merritt Parkway, New York to Connecticut, 1941

Merritt Parkway Creates Scenic Gateway to New England

This Depression-era road improvement project sought to artfully balance the natural and built environments, and despite setbacks and scandal, achieved its aims.

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Nathan Hale: The Man and the Legend

A school teacher hanged as a spy during the American Revolution, Nathan Hale became Connecticut’s official state hero in 1985.

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Connecticut Turnpike Opens – Today in History: January 2

On January 2, 1958, Governor Abraham Ribicoff officially opened the Connecticut Turnpike—today the Governor John Davis Lodge Turnpike—to traffic.

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Oyster grounds, Western Division; Town of Westport

The Battle for Cockenoe Island

In 1967, the United Illuminating Company proposed to build a nuclear power plant on Cockenoe Island off the coast of Westport, but grassroots activism ultimately scuttled that plan.

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Honiss Oyster House, Hartford

Oystering in Connecticut, from Colonial Times to the 21st Century

Why tasty Crassostrea virginica deserves its honored title as state shellfish.

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Sloan Wilson, the Man in the Gray Flannel Suit, is Born – Today in History: May 8

May 8, 2020 • Literature, Norwalk, Westport

On May 8, 1920, American author Sloan Wilson was born…

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New York and New Haven Railroad train bound from Manhattan

Misread Signal Leads to Deadly South Norwalk Train Wreck – Who Knew?

…that by 1853, the era of steamboat transportation had largely…

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Connecticut’s First Municipal Electric Utility

The first municipal electric plant in Connecticut began operating in the City of South Norwalk in 1892 to provide low-cost electricity for street lighting and, a few years later, for homes and businesses.

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A 1947 Movie Details the Unsolved Murder of a Bridgeport Priest

An unusual murder of a Bridgeport, Connecticut, priest in 1924 inspired the movie, Boomerang!, which debuted at the Cannes Film Festival in 1947.

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Portrait of James Mars

1850s Equal Rights Activist James Mars

James Mars was born into slavery in Connecticut in 1790….

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Searching for the Common Good, 1888-1905

Stimulated by immigration and industrialization, Connecticut cities expanded rapidly

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Mambo for Cats by Jim Flora

Jim Flora Captures 20th-Century Pop Culture

From jazz album covers to magazines and children’s books, Rowayton artist Jim Flora created works that helped document life in 20th-century America.

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Selma, Not So Far Away

Father Leonard Tartaglia was sometimes called Hartford’s “Hoodlum Priest.” Like the 1961 film of the same name, Tartaglia ministered to the city’s poor and disenfranchised.

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Over Time: Norwalk’s Historical Population

September 8, 2014 • Hide Featured Image, Norwalk

Census data, from colonial times on up to the present, is a key resource for those who study the ways in which communities change with the passage of time.

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