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Monument to Capewell, the inventor of the famous horseshoe nail

Horseshoe Nail Capital of the World – Who Knew?

…that Hartford, famous as the Insurance Capital of the World, was also once known as the Horseshoe Nail Capital of the World. In the late nineteenth century, George Capewell formed …[more]

Categories: Business and Industry, CT At Work: Hartford Area, Hartford, Invention and Technology, Who Knew?

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Girl’s Stays

Little Nutmeggers: Four Centuries of Children’s Clothes and Games

October 22, 2014

Modes of dress and means of play for youngsters reflect more than changing tastes; they reveal shifts in societal attitudes toward the pre-adult years.  …[more]

Categories: Everyday Life

Paper dresses

Get Out Your Paper Dress, Gal! – Who Knew?

…that in 1966 the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford was featured on the popular TV show I’ve Got a Secret. Actress Arlene Dahl appeared on the show in a dress made …[more]

Categories: Hartford, Popular Culture, Who Knew?

Anna Hyatt Huntington

A Celebrated Artist and a Meaningful Space – Today in History: October 20

October 20, 2014

The Danbury Museum & Historical Society's Huntington Hall honors the memory of a famed US sculptor. …[more]

Categories: Arts, Danbury

Red Cross Emergency Ambulance Station

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918

For those who lived through the 1918 flu, life was never same. John Delano of New Haven recalled, "The neighborhood changed. People changed. Everything changed." …[more]

Categories: Disaster, Health and Medicine

WestHavenPop

Over Time: West Haven’s Historical Population

October 19, 2014

Census data, from colonial times on up to the present, is a key resource for those who study the ways in which communities change with the passage of time. …[more]

Categories: West Haven

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