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Detail for a Map exhibiting the route of the Norwich & Worcester rail-road surveyed by James P. Kirkwood, James Laurie (Civil Engineers)..., ca. 1835 - Connecticut Historical Society and Connecticut History Illustrated

Lisbon Tunnel Completed – Today in History: August 28

August 28, 2015

The Norwich and Worcester Railroad built the first railroad tunnel in Connecticut, and one of the first tunnels in the nation, in the town of Lisbon in the 1830s. …[more]

Categories: Business and Industry, Lisbon, Transportation

Horses crossing the finish line at Charter Oak Park

And They’re Off!: Harness Racing at Charter Oak Park

August 28, 2015

The day was cool and 10,000 spectators crowded the stands at Charter Oak Park to see a come-from-behind victory as Alcryon left the other trotters in the dust.  …[more]

Categories: Popular Culture, Sports and Recreation, West Hartford

Fitch’s Home for Soldiers, ca. 1864

Fitch Soldiers’ Home Closes – Today in History: August 28

August 28, 2015

On August 28, 1940, Fitch’s Home for Soldiers and their Orphans, also known as Fitch’s Home for Soldiers, in Darien, closed its doors and relocated hundreds of Connecticut veterans to …[more]

Categories: Darien, Rocky Hill, War and Defense

Fairground

A Fair to Remember in Brooklyn

August 27, 2015

The Brooklyn Fair is held annually during the last weekend in August and is sponsored by the Windham County Agricultural Society. The society’s goal in sponsoring the fair is to …[more]

Categories: Agriculture, Brooklyn, Everyday Life, Popular Culture, Sports and Recreation

Honiss Oyster House, Hartford

Oystering in Connecticut, from Colonial Times to the 21st Century

August 27, 2015

Why tasty Crassostrea virginica deserves its honored title as state shellfish.  …[more]

Categories: Bridgeport, Business and Industry, Food and Drink, Groton, New Haven, Norwalk, Stonington, The State

Detail of the Culper Spy Ring Code - Library of Congress

Caleb Brewster and the Culper Spy Ring

August 26, 2015

Caleb Brewster used his knowledge of Long Island Sound to serve as a member of the Culper Spy Ring during the Revolutionary War. …[more]

Categories: Benedict Arnold, Bridgeport, Fairfield, Nathan Hale, Revolutionary War

Detail of the South Part of New London Co.

The Rogerenes Leave Their Mark on Connecticut Society

August 25, 2015

A refusal to compromise became the governing principle of this religious group active in the New London area for some 200 years. …[more]

Categories: Belief, Everyday Life, Ledyard, Waterford

Death of Capt. Ferrer, the Captain of the Amistad, July 1839 - Connecticut Historical Society and Connecticut History Illustrated

The Amistad

August 24, 2015

After slaves revolted and took control of the Amistad in 1839, Americans captured the ship off Long Island and imprisoned the slaves in New Haven. A US Supreme Court trial in which Roger Sherman Baldwin and John Quincy Adams defended the slaves, ultimately won them their freedom. …[more]

Categories: Crime and Punishment, Law, New Haven, New London, Slavery and Abolition

News item from the Republican Farmer, June 12,1816

Eighteen-hundred-and-froze-to-death: 1816, The Year Without a Summer

August 24, 2015

Sunspots and volcanic eruptions led to cooler than normal temperatures in the summer of 1816. The cold weather decimated harvests and encouraged many residents to head West into the area of modern Ohio. …[more]

Categories: Agriculture, Disaster, Environment, Weather

Postcard of Dinosaur State Park, ca. 1960s

Discovered Dinosaur Tracks Re-Route Highway and Lead to State Park

August 23, 2015

Some 200 million years ago, carnivorous dinosaurs roamed Rocky Hill leaving the three-toed tracks that would become our state fossil.  …[more]

Categories: Education, Environment, Exploration and Discovery, Rocky Hill, Science

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