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World War I


The First Yale Unit: How U.S. Navy Aviation Began

The legacy forged by the First Yale Unit lead to the creation of the Army Air Corps and military aviation as we know it.

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World War I Poster

War and the Fear of Enemy Aliens – Who Knew?

…that Greenwich had a special police unit trained to handle suspected foreign agents operating in Connecticut.

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The wreck of Major Lufbery's machine, May 19, 1918

World War I Flying Ace Raoul Lufbery

Although his time as a Connecticut resident was short, this aviator left his mark on Wallingford and a generation fighter pilots.

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Fred. J. Hoertz, Your work means victory: Build another one

Freighter Worcester Launched – Today in History: April 5

On April 5, 1919, the steel-hulled freighter Worcester was launched…

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Advertising card of the Dr. Warner’s Caroline Corset

From Bombs to Bras: World War I Conservation Measures Transform the Lives of Women

A shortage of metal during World War I encouraged women’s clothing manufacturers (such as Bridgeport’s Warner Brothers Corset Company) to switch from producing corsets to brassieres.

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Connecticut Agricultural College coeds gathering maple sap for war effort

A New Source of Farm Labor Crops Up in Wartime

During times of war, in Connecticut, as in many other states, women became an increasingly important resource in food production.

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DN-1: The US Navy’s First Airship

The United States military’s experience with lighter-than-air technology began with the Connecticut Aircraft Company’s DN-1 airship built for the navy in 1917.

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The Deutschland at the Connecticut State Pier in New London

New London Harbors a German Submarine During World War I – Who Knew?

The German merchant submarine Deutschland made two trips to America, including one to New London, Connecticut, during World War I.

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World War I broadside referencing Kaiser Wilhelm's Willing Helpers, ca. early 1900s from the Connecticut War Exhibit

Winning the Great War without Some Books

President Wilson’s war speech before Congress on April 3, 1917,…

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American troops of the 28th Infantry Division march down the Champs-Élysées

Connecticut Servicemen in the “Bloody Bucket” Division

Nicknamed the “Keystone Division,” the United States Army’s 28th Infantry…

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Contagious Ward, Greenwich General Hospital, 1916

Health Department Fights Unseen Enemies During World War I

How Greenwich faced the menace of two highly contagious and potentially deadly diseases: polio and Spanish Influenza.

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The Allied Market

Washington’s Sister Susie Society

The Sister Susie Society in Washington, Connecticut, started out as a reading circle but became a fundraising and World War I relief organization.

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Rosamond Danielson: Windham County Suffragist and Community Leader

Rosamond Danielson was a respected suffragist, World War I worker, and philanthropist from Putnam Heights

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The Girl in White, movie advertisement starring June Allyson as Emily Dunning Barringer

New Canaan’s Pioneering Female Physician

Long-time New Canaan resident Dr. Emily Dunning Barringer was the…

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The health of the child is the power of the nation

Helen F. Boyd Leads the Charge for Better Public Health

A long-time Connecticut resident, Helen F. Boyd Powers was a national advocate for greater public access to nursing and healthcare education.

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School children placing flowers on the graves of World War I servicemen

Memorial Day 1920 Brings a Changing of the Guard

In 1920, veterans groups played an active role in orchestrating…

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An Orderly & Decent Government: Significant Events & Developments, 1905-1929

Early 20th century life in Connecticut was marked by the election of 1912, US entry into World War I, and the Great Depression.

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The “Father of American Football” is Born – Today in History: April 7

A native of New Britain, Walter Camp helped revolutionize the game of American football while a student and coach at Yale and for several years afterward.

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Birth of a Nation Advertisement

Hartford’s Challenge to “The Birth of a Nation”

D. W. Griffith’s silent movie, the racially charged “Birth of a Nation,” initially played to large audiences in Hartford before meeting with official resistance after World War I.

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Stubby

A True Dog of War: Sergeant Stubby

In 1917, as the 102nd Infantry, 26th Yankee Division of…

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Two A-10 Thunderbolt IIs from the Connecticut Air National Guard's 103rd Fighter Wing fly in formation behind a KC-135

Connecticut’s “Yankee Watch” Squadron Protects the Skies Here and Abroad

Based in Orange, the 103rd Air Control Squadron of the…

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Boy Scouts carrying World War I banners

Hartford’s Commemoration of World War I Servicemen and Women

At the end of the First World War, Hartford found a variety of ways to honor the sacrifices of its servicemen and women.

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Food Needed to Win the War Comes from Washington

During World War I, the Town of Washington instituted a number of programs to increase food production and preservation to feed Allied armies and the European people,

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The Smith-Worthington Saddle Company

Saddles Fit For a Shah

Since 1794, Hartford-based Smith-Worthington Saddlery has made tack for horses—along with the occasional ostrich harness and space suit prototype.

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Early 20th-Century Immigration in Connecticut

Immigration to Connecticut in the early 20th century continued much…

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Inventor Charles F. Ritchel

Charles Ritchel and the Dirigible

An entrepreneur’s design for a lighter-than-air vehicle takes flight in the late 1800s and inspires a new state industry.

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