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Montville


Mohegan Sacred Sites: Moshup’s Rock

Every nation has a spirit. The Mohegan Spirit moves and breathes within the very rocks and trees of the Mohegan Homeland in Uncasville, Connecticut.

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Connecticut Turnpike Opens – Today in History: January 2

On January 2, 1958, Governor Abraham Ribicoff officially opened the Connecticut Turnpike—today the Governor John Davis Lodge Turnpike—to traffic.

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Chief G’tinemong/Ralph W. Sturges

This Mohegan Chief is remembered for successfully guiding the Tribe through the final stages of Federal Recognition, which it obtained in 1994.

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Connecticut Turnpike Opens – Today in History: January 2

On January 2, 1958, Governor Abraham Ribicoff officially opened the Connecticut Turnpike—today the Governor John Davis Lodge Turnpike—to traffic.

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Frame for Indian round house

Living Rituals: Mohegan Wigwam Festival

The Wigwam festival is a modern version of the ancient Mohegan Thanksgiving for the Corn Harvest, or Green Corn Festival.

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Tantaquidgeon Lodge, Montville

Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon and Mohegan Cultural Renewal

An Ivy league-educated anthropologist, Mohegan Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon not…

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Over Time: Montville’s Historical Population

April 4, 2014 • Hide Featured Image, Montville

Census data, from colonial times on up to the present, is a key resource for those who study the ways in which communities change with the passage of time.

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The house of Samson Occom in Mohegan, Montville

Samson Occom and the Brotherton Indians

A Mohegan and founding member of a pantribal group of Christian Indians, Occum sought to preserve Native autonomy by living apart from European communities.

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The Story Trail of Voices

Mohegan history and religion have been preserved by many different voices in many different families through Mohegan Oral Tradition. However, since before the American Revolution, four women in particular have passed on Mohegan stories.

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Mohegan Federal Recognition

“We are no longer the little old tribe that lives upon the hill. We are now the Nation that lives upon the hill.”

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