Thomaston

Hose and Hook and Ladder Truck Building, Opera House, and Town Hall
Hose and Hook and Ladder Truck Building, Opera House, and Town Hall, Thomaston - Jerry Dougherty

The southern Litchfield County town of Thomaston is located at the confluence of the Naugatuck River and the Northfield and Black Rock Brooks. From 1795 through the late 1800s, present-day Thomaston was the Plymouth Hollow section of Plymouth. Here, clockmaker Seth Thomas earned fame for his mass production techniques and also helped bring the Naugatuck railroad to the hollow. Named in honor of this entrepreneur, Thomaston incorporated from Plymouth in 1875. The town’s industry largely concentrated along the Naugatuck River, with outlying areas remaining agricultural in nature. Today, the Thomaston Opera House, built in 1884, still serves as a cultural center for the town.

LEARN MORE

Places

“Mattatuck State Forest.” Department of Energy & Environmental Protection, 2012. Link.
“Naugatuck Railroad.” Railroad Museum of New England, 2011. Link.

Documents

“Bird’s Eye View of Thomaston, Connecticut. 1908.” Bird’s-eye. New York: Hughes & Bailey, 1908. Connecticut History Online. Link.
“Photograph: Machine Room in Clock Factory, Thomaston.” Connecticut History Online, University of Connecticut Libraries, Archives & Special Collections. Accessed March 31, 2014. Link.
“Photograph: Seth Thomas Clock Factory, Thomaston,” 1949. Connecticut History Online, University of Connecticut Libraries, Archives & Special Collections. Link.
Bailey, O. H. “View of Thomaston, Conn. 1879.” Bird’s-eye. Boston, MA: Bailey, 1879. University of Connecticut Libraries, Map and Geographic Information Center - MAGIC. Link.

Books

J.W. Lewis & Company. History of Litchfield County, Connecticut, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of the Prominent Men and Pioneers. Philadelphia, PA: J.W. Lewis & Company, 1881. Link.
Pape, William J. History of Waterbury and the Naugatuck Valley, Connecticut. Vol. 1. Chicago; New York: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1918. Link.
Wassong, Joseph. Thomaston. Portsmouth,  NH: Arcadia, 2003.
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